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BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography

Open days

Meet your lecturers, find out more about the course and view academic and social facilities at an open day.

UCS Buildings - Nov 2013 (35)
UCAS code: 
B821
Institution code: 
S82
Location: 
Ipswich

Hospital Placement Locations: 
Please see Introduction below.
Duration: 

Three years full-time.

Typical Offer: 

112 UCAS tariff points (or above)
BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC).

 

 
  • In 2016/2017, 96% of our students gained employment after completing their degree.
  • Hone your practice with state-of-the-art imaging equipment in one of 11 NHS placement hospitals.
  • Live and work in a different EU country with our ERASMUS programme (subject to change).

Introduction

From the beginning of your degree in Diagnostic Radiography, you start learning your skills using a range of sophisticated technology in a modern healthcare setting.

From of X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT) and Ultrasound to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Nuclear Medicine, you gain the relevant expertise to produce high quality images to diagnose or assess injury or disease.

We also support you in building superb interpersonal, technical and problem-solving skills, while you learn about the needs of patients and patient pathways.

Work experience is invaluable in a rapidly evolving field. Your placement makes up 60% of your course – between 17-24 weeks each year – and takes place under the supervision of a dedicated practice educator.

 

We do our best to place you in your preferred hospital, however, we cannot guarantee this. Our regional NHS partners are:

In your final year, you have the fantastic opportunity to live and work in a Scandinavian country, Portugal, Netherlands, Malta, Ireland or Austria through our ERASMUS European Exchange. 

The three-month placement is your chance to specialise in an area such as ultrasound, pharmacology, emergency radiography, interventional radiography, or CT and MRI scanning, while enjoying a different country and culture.

Apart from Belfast, we are the only UK university to offer this exciting developmental experience. Visit the ERASMUS website to find out more.

The course is accredited by The Society of Radiographers and once you have graduated, you are eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) so you can practice professionally.

We embed the NHS Constitution Values in everything we do, underpinning the expectations of our staff and students and our practice settings. Go to the Government’s website for the full NHS England Constitution and Values.

For more about studying Diagnostic Radiography with us, why not take a moment to listen to our short podcast?

If you have any questions, please get in touch. Email Victoria Jones V.Jones4@UOS.AC.UK. Or Chris Cobb, Course Leader: c.cobb@uos.ac.uk

Further information about the University's relationship with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the Society and College of Radiographers (SCoR) is available in the PSRB register.

Course modules

In your first year, you learn about the principles and practice of radiography, with lecturer-led activities, guided reading and closely supervised practice. Studying more complex elements in the second year involves reflecting on practice and developing analytical, critical and problem-solving skills. You are given greater autonomy in the third year, with increased responsibility for your own learning and continued professional development.

To meet the learning needs of students, we teach using lectures, seminars, group work and practical sessions. We assess using a variety of methods such as examinations, Objective Structured Examinations (OSEs), viva voces, posters, presentations, seminars, practice-based portfolios and practice assessment documents (PADs).

Full downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.

Preparation for Practice

This module precedes the first practice placement, enabling the student to develop a sound knowledge base of health care principles which can be applied in the practice environment to provide safe and effective care. It will introduce and prepare the students to work within the National Health Service (NHS) and embody the NHS constitution and values. This module encourages the start of professional growth and ensures the development of essential personal skills such as resilience and responding to constructive feedback. 

Principles of Imaging

This module will introduce the student to the scientific principles which directly underpin the production of X-radiation, its interaction with tissue and the capture of the emergent X-ray beam. The module will provide an opportunity for the student to develop essential theoretical knowledge and understanding of X-radiation generating equipment as well as image acquisition and manipulation techniques encountered in practice.

DI 1: Imaging of the Appendicular Skeleton and Chest, Abdomen and Pelvis

This module is designed to give the student an understanding of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the appendicular and axial skeleton, chest and respiratory system, and abdomen.  It will introduce the student to the common radiographic techniques employed in projection radiography and discuss care of the patient for such examinations.

Imaging 2 Gastrointestinal and Hepatobiliary Systems

This module is designed to enable the student to develop a detailed understanding of the anatomy, physiology and common pathology of the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The module will build upon the student’s understanding of radiographic projection imaging, and introduce common procedures used to image the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems.

Diagnostic Imaging Practice 1

This module is designed to enable students to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills within the practice setting. Students will be given the opportunity through structured practice placements to make links between theory and practice based on the content of year 1 Imaging modules. This will be reinforced with practice tutorials undertaken by practice educators and specialists in the practice setting.

Personal and Professional Development

The purpose of the module is to enable students to identify and understand their key personal abilities in the context of their future career aspirations. The development of their personal and professional skill set is essential to a successful and rewarding career. Through the development of their critical, reflective abilities and their confidence and competence, they will evaluate their current strengths and weaknesses and take ownership of their personal and professional development.  

Cardiovascular, Urinary and Reproductive Systems

This module is designed to enable the student to develop a detailed understanding of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular, urinary and reproductive systems.  The module will build upon the student’s understanding of radiographic projection imaging and introduce a variety of other imaging procedures used to image the cardiovascular, urinary and reproductive systems.

Imaging 5 Endocrine and Central Nervous system

This module is designed to enable the student to develop a detailed understanding of the anatomy, physiology and pathology of the endocrine and central nervous systems. The module will build upon the student’s understanding of radiographic projection imaging and introduce a variety of other imaging procedures used to image the endocrine and central nervous systems.

Clinical Imaging and Technology

Diagnostic radiography is concerned with providing safe and accurate imaging examinations in order to facilitate appropriate treatment and management of service users presenting with a range of increasingly complex conditions. Such examinations encompass a wide range of situations across the life span, including acute and chronic conditions, trauma and health screening. This involves the use of specialised imaging modalities to facilitate diagnosis and expedite treatment. Diagnostic radiographers are required to perform and assist with these procedures. 

Imaging 3 Trauma and Orthopaedic Imaging

The successful outcome of orthopaedic and trauma imaging of the chest and appendicular skeleton requires a sound knowledge of the presenting conditions, adaptation of technique and an understanding of the resultant images. This module aims to provide the student with an opportunity to evaluate this area of radiography and develop an appreciation of the factors which can enhance its diagnostic efficacy.

The Service User

The needs of diagnostic imaging service users and their carers vary considerably. These needs may relate to mental and physical disabilities, sociological and psychological issues, and age and physical development, as well as to the pathological conditions that are being investigated. It is essential that practitioners appreciate and respect the needs of all users and maintain equality of access in accordance with current healthcare policy and guidelines.   Practitioners need to be able to provide service users with information about their imaging procedure and be able to adapt this to each individual person.

Research Methods

The development of research skills is an essential requirement for all graduates. The Society of Radiographers (SoR) advise that in order for radiography practice to advance, radiographers need to lead and participate in research and implement the findings of such research to enable improvements in health care delivery, patient care, technological innovations, education and development of the workforce.  The Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency requires radiographers to be able to engage in evidence-based practice.

Clinical Practice 2

This module is designed to enable students to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills within the practice setting. Students will be given the opportunity through structured practice placements to make links between theory and practice based on the content of year 2 Imaging modules. This will be reinforced with practice tutorials undertaken by practice educators and specialists in the practice setting.

Imaging 6 Contemporary Issues in Diagnostic Imaging

Radiographers work as part of a multidisciplinary healthcare team and actively contribute to the patient pathway. In undertaking their role, radiographers are required to apply theoretical knowledge and practical skills within a multi-disciplinary context.  They provide accurate information for users attending for a range of examinations and procedures which needs to be underpinned with sound knowledge of the related technology, procedure or examination. 

Image Interpretation

This module provides a learning opportunity for students to develop skills in aspects relevant to image interpretation, clinical reporting and decision making. This encompasses both academic and clinical components and reflects the Society and College of Radiographer’s expectation that undergraduate programmes should include aspects of medical image interpretation and clinical reporting in the curriculum.

Becoming the Practitioner

This module is designed to prepare the students with a portfolio of skills in preparation for their first post as a radiographer.  It will afford the students the opportunity to explore a range of professional issues and the wider implications of current government initiatives and policies and to critically reflect on the NHS constitution, principles and values.  Aspects and experience of role transition will also be discussed, underpinned by recent research and input from alumni. Students will be introduced to the principles of teaching and learning. The roles of supervision and mentoring learners in the practice environment will also be scrutinised.

 

Research Project

This module builds upon the Research Methods module and has been informed by the Society and College of Radiographers’ research strategy (2016-21). The research project provides the opportunity for students to develop an individual study drawn from an aspect of radiography. It will enable students to utilise skills developed throughout the course and allow them to apply problem solving and decision making skills in a novel situation. The research project also provides a mechanism for the continuing development of autonomy and self-direction.

Clinical Practice 3

This module is designed to enable students to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills within the practice setting. Students will be given the opportunity through structured practice placements to make links between theory and practice based on the content of the year 3 Imaging module. This will be reinforced with practice tutorials undertaken by practice educators and specialists in the practice setting. Students will be supported to practically apply their knowledge and understanding of image interpretation, clinical reporting and decision making within the practice setting. 

Erasmus Module (Incoming Module) - Individually Negotiated Study

This module will enable the student to select a topic to study in greater depth. It will enable the student to plan, research and produce a piece of individual study developed from a specialist aspect of radiography practice. In doing so, the student will develop problem solving skills, through gaining experience in the formulation and application of action plans and strategies, and a degree of autonomy in learning. If you choose this module, it replaces Diagnostic Imaging 9: Advances in Diagnostic Imaging and the Interprofessional Learning: The Professional in the Team.

Erasmus Module (Outgoing Module)

A module undertaken at a partner institution; the focus of which will be a specialist area of practice in radiography.

Career opportunities

As a specialist degree, we are very proud of our graduates, with the majority going on to careers as diagnostic radiographers. Other students progress to study for postgraduate qualifications in specialist areas so they can become advanced or consultant practitioners.

The skills learnt during the course are also transferable, opening up routes to other careers in education, industry and research. There are also opportunities to practice as a radiographer in a range of other countries.

Take a look at this career structure for radiography for more inspiration.

Student profiles

I’m from Basildon in Essex originally and before I came to University I was working as an administration assistant at the nuclear medicine department in UCLH. The University of Suffolk was recommended to me by a former work colleague of mine who had studied there previously. I wan...

I had an accident in 2002 falling off a container ship at Ipswich docks. Before that I was in the military. I left the military one month before I had the accident and the accident actually caused a subdural haematoma in my brain which is a small bleed. After that for many years I...

Fees and finance

2020-21

  • Full-time tuition fee: £9,250 p.a.
  • International tuition fee: £16,405 p.a. (inclusive of placement fee)

Further Information

  • Detailed information about Tuition Fees
  • Find out more about Financial Support eligibility.
  • Also see Loans and Grants.
  • At University of Suffolk, your tuition fees provide access to all the usual teaching and learning facilities that you would expect. However, there may be additional costs associated with your course that you will need to budget for. See Course Costs.

Entry requirements

Academic Requirements

112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC) or Access to Higher Education Diploma - a minimum of 45 Level 3 credits at merit grade or above

Applicants are expected to hold five GCSEs grade 4/C or above to include Mathematics, English and Science.

Please note, equivalent Level 2 qualifications will not be accepted.

Applicants whose first language is not English, but who have been living in the UK for 2 years or more will be expected to hold GCSE English at Grade A-C, (grade 4-9 for the new GCSE), or a comparable GCSE equivalent from their home country.

Also see How to Apply.

Non-Academic Requirements

Any offer of a place will be subject to:

  • Successful interview
  • Satisfactory Health check
  • Satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check
  • One satisfactory academic or employment reference

The process of selection is two stage: admissions tests (literacy and numeracy) and Multiple Mini Interviews (MMIs).

As part of the selection process, you will be expected to demonstrate a good knowledge and clear understanding of the scope of work that a radiographer is required to undertake as well as the significance of the NHS Constitution and values.

International Requirements

IELTS 7.0 (with a minimum of 6.5 in each component) 

For applicants whose first language is not English, but who have been living in the UK for less than 2 years (or have not lived in the UK at all), we will accept IELTS or the University of Suffolk Password test as meeting the GCSE English requirement.

Also see International and EU.

Transferring Credit

If you have previously studied at higher education level before you may be able to transfer credits to a related course at the University of Suffolk and reduce the period of study time necessary to achieve your degree.

Staff

Lecturer in Diagnostic Radiography

Associate Professor in Diagnostic Radiography

Associate Professor in Diagnostic Radiography

Lecturer in Diagnostic Radiography

Lecturer in Diagnostic Radiography

Lecturer in Diagnostic Radiography

Facilities and Resources

Your time with on your degree will be split between the Waterfront Building, our innovative Atrium Building, and your hospital placement.

The Waterfront Building has six floors, one auditorium which seats 200 people, two main lecture theatres each seating 140 people and 34 teaching rooms seating between 18 and 80 people. Every teaching room has state-of-the-art AV equipment enhancing students learning experience and spread across the open study areas there are approximately 50 iMacs. We offer open study on all floors, where students can access networked computers.

The Atrium houses the Ipswich Waterfront Innovation Centre (IWIC) and our well-resourced library, which offers extensive print and digital resources, with plenty of study space and pods for extra privacy.

UCS-Waterfront-Building-Study-Space.jpg

UCS-Waterfront-Building-Study-Space 1

Study space is available to all students in the Waterfront Building.