STUDY

Undergraduate

BSc (Hons) Nutrition and Human Health

Grapefruit segments
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: BB49
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, five years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: BB49
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, five years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)

Overview

Nutrition is recognised as a cornerstone in the maintenance of health, wellbeing, and longevity with the power to reduce the economic and social burden on health systems.  The BSc (Hons) Nutrition and Human Health degree program will take you on an exciting journey to become a competent nutritionist.

While studying for the degree, you will examine various aspects of the science of nutrition including biochemistry, metabolism, food systems, food composition, dietary analysis, molecular aspects of food nutrients, social/behavioural aspects, health and wellbeing, and professional conduct, leading to a full understanding of the dietary role in disease prevention and health management. Through this journey, you will be trained to identify signs and risks of under-, and overnutrition whether and how to assess the energy and nutritional status overall. Other interesting and contemporary areas are nutrition across lifespan, integrative and adaptive metabolic aspects, nutritional research methodologies, functional ingredients and bioactives, probiotics, prebiotics, gut microbiota, food intolerances, functional bowel disorders, and nutrition in mental health. The relevance of these areas of knowledge to human health is the focal point of this degree.  

In addition to supplementing theoretical knowledge with practical skills through laboratory and physiological study sessions, there is the opportunity for you to partake in research projects in the latest topics in nutrition and human health either in vitro or with human participants. 

This combination of subjects gives you the breadth and depth of knowledge to undertake physiological and anthropometric assessments, carry out laboratory analysis of nutrients and offer evidence-based professional advice on diet and lifestyle. As a graduate of this degree, you will be equipped with knowledge for the workplace and follow a career as a nutritionist, researcher, or educator. The broad and robust scientific skills, communication skills, and creative thinking developed on the programme will make you particularly attractive to companies and organisations searching for scientists capable of dealing with data in epidemiological fields.

Further information about the University's relationship with the Association for Nutrition is available in the PSRB register.

Accreditation

This course has received a formal accreditation by the Association for Nutrition.

The University of Suffolk is world-class and committed to our region. We are proudly modern and innovative and we believe in transformative education. We are on the rise with a focus on student satisfaction, graduate prospects, spending on academic services and student facilities.

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in the East of England for graduate prospects

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in the UK for spend on academic services

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in the UK for social inclusion

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Course Modules

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as block and blend' — more information can be found on Why Suffolk?  You can also watch our Block and Blend video.   

There is an optional work-based module, which provides an excellent opportunity for you to gain relevant work experience and enhance your employability skills. In addition, students at all levels are encouraged to seek out appropriate relevant work experience, either voluntary or paid in their spare time, as a means to improve their employability skills and to network with potential future employers. 

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.

Close-up of a microscope

Healthy populations require food that is of an appropriate nutritional quality and safe for consumption. This module therefore introduces students to some of the ways in which food production and processing influences nutritional quality and food safety, and subsequently human health. Students are also introduced to food spoilage and food contaminants (microbiological, chemicals, natural toxins), and some of the measures used to prevent harm from these sources.

This module is designed to give a solid foundation on which to build further study in biological science.  It will investigate the fundamentals of biochemistry starting from basic atomic structure and bonding to then focus on the structure, function and metabolism of macromolecules. Students with differing levels of previous knowledge of chemistry and biology will be introduced to the range of processes taking place within the body at a molecular level.

A thorough understanding of human physiology and the maintenance of homeostasis are key facets in a range of scientific disciplines. In this module, students will study the way in which different cells, tissues, organs and systems contribute to homeostasis from a theoretical perspective.

This module will provide you with the core skills required to carry out basic scientific procedures and communicate their research in an appropriate scientific format.  The module is based on a series of practical sessions and is designed to develop the skills required for subsequent advanced modules on the course.

Nutrition is a multidisciplinary subject that amongst other areas draws upon biochemistry, physiology, psychology, food science, cell biology and  global human health. This module is intended to draw together these areas together to allow students to see the bigger picture and appreciate that nutrition requires a knowledge of all of these areas and how they interplay. The module will cover a breadth of topics and attempt to find the links and demonstrate the necessity for a multidisciplinary approach.

Valid and reliable measurements are of vital importance in understanding human physiological function, which in itself is the foundation of many natural and life sciences. Scientists are often required to investigate cell, tissue, organ and system physiology, drawing rational and objective conclusions from the measurement(s) used. These measurements are the basis of physiological investigation, and this module introduces students to their use and requirements. 

This module builds on modules at level four in order to develop the application of knowledge. The general philosophy is to link nutrition and its underlying biochemistry to human health and develop a clear understanding of the links between physiology and cell biology. The module will combine a range of concepts to help students contextualize nutrition and metabolism in human health. Students will also learn to use and interpret dietary analysis software.

The module will explore the role of psychological factors in the cause, progression and consequences of health and illness and methods of epidemiology. It also aims to understand the role of behaviour and beliefs in the aetiology of health and illness and apply that knowledge to predict unhealthy behaviour and promote healthy behaviour.

Effective scientists need to understand how experimentation and research drives science forward and how this is communicated. This module prepares students for further study and employment by providing an understanding of what science is and how it works; it also prepares students for the Dissertation module at Level 6.  It introduces students to the principles of scientific research and the planning and design of experiments.  Students will learn how to effectively analyse literature and communicate science in a variety of methods. Students will also study the detailed aspects of research design and planning.

Effective scientists need to understand how experimentation and numerical analysis of data drives science forward via the process of attempted falsification and how this is quantified and presented. This module prepares students for further study and employment by providing an understanding of inferential statistical analysis of scientific data.

This module will give students an understanding of how biochemical analysis is conducted in order to demonstrate the fundamental origins of the data used to assess the nutritional value of food. It will provide an adequate grounding for students wishing to pursue a career in laboratory based nutrition research, and demystify the process by which nutrition analysis occurs

This module is designed to review the nature of and causation of diseases, by considering environmental, genetic, and biologic factors and link the characteristics of disease to the signs and symptoms utilised in diagnosis. Particular emphasis is given to elucidating the pathophysiological and molecular/biomolecular aspects behind each disease presented. The module will also give the students the opportunity to investigate the positive and negative effects of diet on health and disease.

This module provides students with the opportunity to enhance their employability skills and experience through undertaking a 100 hour period of work-based experience in a field related to their degree. Students can continue to develop their graduate key skills. This module can also be undertaken by students who are already in relevant employment, thereby enhancing their career development.  The work experience would involve activities where students can be given (supervised) responsibility for a task and to be able to exercise a degree of decision-making and personal responsibility.

An understanding of the immunological process has been fundamental to many of the advances made in science and medicine.  In this module students will explore the cellular basis of infection via pathogens and the immunological defence system the body deploys in order to prevent the development of infectious disease.  The module will deal with the structure and function of the human immune system in terms of the innate and adaptive immune responses focusing on the cells and molecules involved. 

This module will develop the necessary skills required to maximise students’ success following graduation in the Life Sciences.  In this module students will explore the numerous career paths available for life science graduates, will gain experience of graduate recruitment processes, and will critically analyse their own skills and capabilities to develop, reflect and improve their professional career prospects.  In addition, the students will be introduced to elements of business and entrepreneurship. In particular, areas such as outlining a business plan, patent application, intellectual property, clinical trials and policymaking will be explored.

This module will consider factors such as food choice, food marketing, nutrition communication, public health nutrition as a means to understand wider issues in nutrition and what drives our behaviour in order to improve health and wellbeing. The module will draw together biological, psychological, social and political factors that influence energy homeostasis in order to suggest strategies for prevention and management of obesity.

The module will examine nutrition as it relates to the prevention and treatment of disease and deals with the nutritional aspects of diseases and clinical disorders by integrating students' existing knowledge of physiology, biochemistry and food science. Students will also consider the nutritional requirements of humans throughout the lifespan; the changing physiological status and subsequent changes in nutritional requirements will be studied along with a critical appraisal of how this is met with respect to diet, sociological status, geography and education.

The dissertation will be a research-based study, central to which will be some form of hypothesis testing or problem solving.  It will enable students to utilise practical, intellectual and decision making skills in novel situations. The dissertation will provide a mechanism for the development of autonomy and self-direction whilst undertaking a problem solving approach to a research topic.

In the fast growing body of nutrition research, there are newly emerging fields such as functional foods, chrononutrition and Nutritional role in chronic inflammation, among others.  This module aims to cover the present and future trends in the field. Examples of the topics that will be covered are gut microbial dysbiosis implications in various diseases and strategies of restorations (dietary approaches, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics), phytosterols, phenolic compounds, and bioactive peptides. This module aims to give a holistic understanding of the physiological functions of food beyond the basic nutritional requirements.

Course Modules 2024

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as block and blend' — more information can be found on Why Suffolk?  You can also watch our Block and Blend video.   

There is an optional work-based module, which provides an excellent opportunity for you to gain relevant work experience and enhance your employability skills. In addition, students at all levels are encouraged to seek out appropriate relevant work experience, either voluntary or paid in their spare time, as a means to improve their employability skills and to network with potential future employers. 

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.

Red cabbage

Healthy populations require food that is of an appropriate nutritional quality and safe for consumption. This module therefore introduces students to some of the ways in which food production and processing influences nutritional quality and food safety, and subsequently human health. Students are also introduced to food spoilage and food contaminants (microbiological, chemicals, natural toxins), and some of the measures used to prevent harm from these sources.

This module is designed to give a solid foundation on which to build further study in biological science.  It will investigate the fundamentals of biochemistry starting from basic atomic structure and bonding to then focus on the structure, function and metabolism of macromolecules. Students with differing levels of previous knowledge of chemistry and biology will be introduced to the range of processes taking place within the body at a molecular level.

A thorough understanding of human physiology and the maintenance of homeostasis are key facets in a range of scientific disciplines. In this module, students will study the way in which different cells, tissues, organs and systems contribute to homeostasis from a theoretical perspective.

This module will provide you with the core skills required to carry out basic scientific procedures and communicate their research in an appropriate scientific format.  The module is based on a series of practical sessions and is designed to develop the skills required for subsequent advanced modules on the course.

Nutrition is a multidisciplinary subject that amongst other areas draws upon biochemistry, physiology, psychology, food science, cell biology and  global human health. This module is intended to draw together these areas together to allow students to see the bigger picture and appreciate that nutrition requires a knowledge of all of these areas and how they interplay. The module will cover a breadth of topics and attempt to find the links and demonstrate the necessity for a multidisciplinary approach.

Valid and reliable measurements are of vital importance in understanding human physiological function, which in itself is the foundation of many natural and life sciences. Scientists are often required to investigate cell, tissue, organ and system physiology, drawing rational and objective conclusions from the measurement(s) used. These measurements are the basis of physiological investigation, and this module introduces students to their use and requirements. 

This module builds on modules at level four in order to develop the application of knowledge. The general philosophy is to link nutrition and its underlying biochemistry to human health and develop a clear understanding of the links between physiology and cell biology. The module will combine a range of concepts to help students contextualize nutrition and metabolism in human health. Students will also learn to use and interpret dietary analysis software.

The module will explore the role of psychological factors in the cause, progression and consequences of health and illness and methods of epidemiology. It also aims to understand the role of behaviour and beliefs in the aetiology of health and illness and apply that knowledge to predict unhealthy behaviour and promote healthy behaviour.

Effective scientists need to understand how experimentation and research drives science forward and how this is communicated. This module prepares students for further study and employment by providing an understanding of what science is and how it works; it also prepares students for the Dissertation module at Level 6.  It introduces students to the principles of scientific research and the planning and design of experiments.  Students will learn how to effectively analyse literature and communicate science in a variety of methods. Students will also study the detailed aspects of research design and planning.

Effective scientists need to understand how experimentation and numerical analysis of data drives science forward via the process of attempted falsification and how this is quantified and presented. This module prepares students for further study and employment by providing an understanding of inferential statistical analysis of scientific data.

This module will give students an understanding of how biochemical analysis is conducted in order to demonstrate the fundamental origins of the data used to assess the nutritional value of food. It will provide an adequate grounding for students wishing to pursue a career in laboratory based nutrition research, and demystify the process by which nutrition analysis occurs

This module is designed to review the nature of and causation of diseases, by considering environmental, genetic, and biologic factors and link the characteristics of disease to the signs and symptoms utilised in diagnosis. Particular emphasis is given to elucidating the pathophysiological and molecular/biomolecular aspects behind each disease presented. The module will also give the students the opportunity to investigate the positive and negative effects of diet on health and disease.

This module provides students with the opportunity to enhance their employability skills and experience through undertaking a 100 hour period of work-based experience in a field related to their degree. Students can continue to develop their graduate key skills. This module can also be undertaken by students who are already in relevant employment, thereby enhancing their career development.  The work experience would involve activities where students can be given (supervised) responsibility for a task and to be able to exercise a degree of decision-making and personal responsibility.

An understanding of the immunological process has been fundamental to many of the advances made in science and medicine.  In this module students will explore the cellular basis of infection via pathogens and the immunological defence system the body deploys in order to prevent the development of infectious disease.  The module will deal with the structure and function of the human immune system in terms of the innate and adaptive immune responses focusing on the cells and molecules involved. 

This module will develop the necessary skills required to maximise students’ success following graduation in the Life Sciences.  In this module students will explore the numerous career paths available for life science graduates, will gain experience of graduate recruitment processes, and will critically analyse their own skills and capabilities to develop, reflect and improve their professional career prospects.  In addition, the students will be introduced to elements of business and entrepreneurship. In particular, areas such as outlining a business plan, patent application, intellectual property, clinical trials and policymaking will be explored.

This module will consider factors such as food choice, food marketing, nutrition communication, public health nutrition as a means to understand wider issues in nutrition and what drives our behaviour in order to improve health and wellbeing. The module will draw together biological, psychological, social and political factors that influence energy homeostasis in order to suggest strategies for prevention and management of obesity.

The module will examine nutrition as it relates to the prevention and treatment of disease and deals with the nutritional aspects of diseases and clinical disorders by integrating students' existing knowledge of physiology, biochemistry and food science. Students will also consider the nutritional requirements of humans throughout the lifespan; the changing physiological status and subsequent changes in nutritional requirements will be studied along with a critical appraisal of how this is met with respect to diet, sociological status, geography and education.

The dissertation will be a research-based study, central to which will be some form of hypothesis testing or problem solving.  It will enable students to utilise practical, intellectual and decision making skills in novel situations. The dissertation will provide a mechanism for the development of autonomy and self-direction whilst undertaking a problem solving approach to a research topic.

In the fast growing body of nutrition research, there are newly emerging fields such as functional foods, chrononutrition and Nutritional role in chronic inflammation, among others.  This module aims to cover the present and future trends in the field. Examples of the topics that will be covered are gut microbial dysbiosis implications in various diseases and strategies of restorations (dietary approaches, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics), phytosterols, phenolic compounds, and bioactive peptides. This module aims to give a holistic understanding of the physiological functions of food beyond the basic nutritional requirements.

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WHY SUFFOLK

16th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Best Facilities 2023

WUSCA 2023

5th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Career Prospects 2023

WUSCA 2023

14th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Student Support 2023

WUSCA 2023

Entry Requirements

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Career Opportunities

The programme recognises the importance of equipping you with appropriate knowledge and expertise that can readily be employed within the workplace or in post-graduate study. Additionally, the course prepares students for higher level study such as a PGCE (e.g. science teacher training), Master’s degree or PhD. 

Opportunities exist in a wide range of careers in nutrition and health in both the private and public sectors:

  • Nutritionist
  • Dietetic assistant
  • Health Improvement Scientists
  • Nutrition Research 
  • Nutritional evaluation in the food industry
  • Public Health Charites 
  • Local Education Authorities 
  • Higher level study such as a PGCE (e.g. science teacher training), Master’s degree or PhD.

Recent examples include graduates who now work for the NHS, Nestlé, Yakult, and national and local nutrition and health services.

Science graduates gain a number of transferrable skills such as data handling and analysis. This means that other industries such as insurance, banking and even retail management look to recruit science graduates.

Your Course Team

Dr Fandi Ibrahim

Fandi is Associate Professor and Course Leader for Nutrition and Human Health and an internationally recognised expert in the field of functional foods.

Fandi Ibrahim staff profile photo

Dr Vanessa Sharp

Vanessa is Lecturer in Nutrition and Human Health within Life Sciences across Nutrition and Human Health, Biomedical Science and Biological Science courses.

Vanessa Sharp staff profile photo

Emma Harvey-Lawrence

Emma is Lecturer in Public Health and owns a private clinic based in Woolpit that provides a multi-disciplined approach to support health and wellbeing.

Emma Harvey-Lawrence staff profile photo

Dr Nick Tucker

Nick is course leader for Biomedical Sciences and is a molecular microbiologist interested in the biology of Pseudomonas bacteria.

Nick Tucker staff profile photo

Cátia Marques

Catia is Course Leader in Biological Sciences and has worked in cell research in several laboratories across Europe.

Catia Marques staff profile photo

David Bowers

David is Senior Lecturer in Life Sciences (Maths) and a mathematician, statistician and learning developer.

David Bowers staff profile photo

Dr Federica Masieri

Federica is Associate Professor and Course Leader in MSc Regenerative Medicine.

Federica Masieri staff profile photo

Robert Ellis

Rob is Associate Dean for Learning, Teaching and the Student Experience as well as the Director of Life Sciences.

Rob Ellis staff profile photo

Dr Imogen Butcher

Imogen is a lecturer on the Biomedical Science and Bioscience degree courses.

Richard Farrar

Richard teaches and leads a number of modules on the School’s undergraduate programmes including BSc Nutrition and Human Health and BSc Bioscience.

Richard Farrar staff profile photo

Dr Silvia Atanasio

Silvia is a Senior Laboratory Technical Learning Instructor, responsible for the running of Life Science laboratories and providing technical support.

Silvia Atanasio staff profile photo

Dr Svetlana Gretton

Svetlana is a Life Science Technical Learning Instructor in the School of Technology, Business and Arts.

Svetlana Gretton staff profile photo

Martin Sinclair (IHWB)

Martin is a Visiting Professor of Gastro-intestinal Disease.

Fees and Funding

UK Full-time Tuition Fee

£9,250

per year
UK Part-time Tuition Fee

£1,454*

per 20 credit module
International Full-time Tuition Fee

£15,210

per year

*Please contact the Student Centre for further details

The decision to study a degree is an investment into your future, there are various means of support available to you in order to help fund your tuition fees and living costs. You can apply for funding from the Spring before your course starts.

UK Fees and Finance UK Bursaries and Scholarships International Fees and Scholarships

Ipswich Award

The University of Suffolk is offering a £1,000 Award for students joining the University of Suffolk’s Ipswich campus. The Award is based on specific eligibility criteria based on your year of entry.

More information
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How to Apply

To study this course on a full-time basis, you can apply through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

Apply Now Further Information on Applying
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