STUDY

Undergraduate

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Sociology

Handprint from a powdered substance
Course options: Professional Placement, Study Abroad
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: L390
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full time, four and a half to nine years part-time.
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points or above, BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Course options: Professional Placement, Study Abroad
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: L390
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full time, four and a half to nine years part-time.
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points or above, BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)

Overview

The University of Suffolk Criminology and Sociology degree tackles controversial public issues and encourages open debate. All crime has a social context so it makes sense to study criminology and sociology together.

This joint honours degree is carefully designed and constructed so you can study both criminology and sociology together and you will be taught by a team who will know you. You will be challenged to ask searching questions about inequality, fairness, power and violence while grasping the complex detail of our social world. You will be able to explore policing, prisons and challenging real world issues such as gender, sexuality, injustice, migration, and major global social changes in all parts of our world. Our course develops the skills you need to analyse and think carefully and knowledgeably about modern life.

Preparatory reading list for Criminology 

Preparatory reading list for Sociology 

The University of Suffolk is world-class and committed to our region. We are proudly modern and innovative and we believe in transformative education. We are on the rise with a focus on student satisfaction, graduate prospects, spending on academic services and student facilities.

2nd

in the UK for teaching satisfaction for Criminology

The Guardian University Guide 2023

2nd

in the UK for graduate prospects for Criminology

The Times Good University Guide 2023

4th

for graduate prospects in Sociology

The Complete University Guide 2024

Course Modules

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend' - more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.

For this course all modules are assessed and a range of assessment methods are used, including essays, reports, case studies, videos, portfolios, critiques, presentations, reviews and examinations. 

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.
Fingerprint on transparent surface

This module gives you a solid foundation in criminology using a topic-based approach. You will examine how we can make sense of crime and criminality and explore key areas of debate and controversy within the discipline of criminology. Crime dominates much discussion on the political and social stage and this module enables you to take part and contribute to these public discussions in an informed and knowledgeable way. You will be able to discuss the cause and nature of crime and criminality. Important practical data skills of mapping crime data are a key part in this module.  

This module aims to introduce you to key features of the sociological perspective and what many call the sociological imagination. It is concerned with making the everyday strange and the far away near to gain a better grasp on key aspects of social life. This leads into a key concern of sociology with questions of power and inequality. Students will be able to engage with key debates about the nature of inequality and power using contemporary examples and analysis. 

This module introduces you to key university academic skills to set yourself up for the rest of your degree. You will develop your academic skills through practical activities and tasks that relate to your degree. You will also explore core concepts and principles that underpin research in the social sciences. The module has a developmental approach to learning and teaching reinforced through regularly meetings in small groups with your tutor 

This module describes and explains some of the major social changes over the past 30-40 years using data and ideas. You will study patterns of wider change alongside an exploration of the impact on personal biography, life-satisfaction and wellbeing. You will study the rapid changes in East Asia, the differences with Europe and ways we can think through long term trends in how we live. Learning is organised through a problem-solving approach to get to grips with ideas and data in areas of change as diverse as wellbeing, fertility, family, work, migration and technology.  

Contemporary criminal justice is shaped by the past and this module provides you with the historical context to better understand contemporary criminological debates. You will have an introduction to the history of crime, crime control and punishment in England and Wales, Europe, the Islamic and Asian world as well as ancient Rome and Greece. The module reflects the interdisciplinary nature of criminology. Using scholarship from criminology, philosophy and humanities the module will locate contemporary debates within a wider historical context and help you develop a critical understanding of today’s crime issues and questions.  

The human story is a moving story, and we are migratory beings. This module will help you explore the history of people’s movement across the globe. You will explore the causes of migration, its voluntary and forced forms, asylum seeking and the main current global patterns of migration.  

This module grounds you in the principles of social science research and methods employed to find out about our social world. You will explore the research process and focus on specific methods that interest you and relate to your field of study. This will include being able develop and analyse social surveys and questionnaires, use interviews, and explore already existing data sources. You will gain the knowledge, skills and confidence to undertake independent, ethical and robust research in the social sciences. This module is an important steppingstone to your final year independent project module. 

Social theory allows you to dig deep into the big questions in our social world about how power works, what is the glue that keeps society together most of the time and how and why do societies change. You will harness the power of thinking theoretically to be creative, tackle contemporary issues and open new insights into your social world. We will do this through the ideas of important theorists from the late 20th and early 21st centuries, a few will be familiar like Weber, Du Bois or Durkheim but many new such as Archer, Latour, Chodorow or Luhmann. You will engage with the insightful, often challenging and sometimes counter-intuitive perspectives that come from a range of contemporary social theorists. 

The module aims to equip students to get behind the ‘woolliness’ of much popular discussion of globalization. For many commentators globalisation is the major force behind social, economic, political and cultural change over the past 30 years. It is also a much-misunderstood concept that provokes much heated debate between those who argue free markets are the motor of globalization to the constant benefit of humankind, and anti-globalization critics who see many of the world’s ills stemming from the increase in globalization.. On this module you will need to analyse the arguments, look at the data and make an informed decision about where you stand.  

Being able to answer why questions about crime and deviance is an essential part of the study of criminology. This module builds upon the foundations laid in the module Introduction to Criminology. You will explore the range of theories used to explain crime and criminal behaviour and the theoretical debates around three broad levels of criminological explanation: the individual, the situational, and the structural. You will also explore more recent approaches that centre on green crime and the relationship to wider society and a range of political and social issues.  

This module examines youth crime from competing criminological perspectives. It evaluates the association between young people and crime in historical, sociological and legal perspective. You will explore how social constructions of youth and crime shaped criminal justice policy and systems. You will develop and in-depth consideration of the procedures, policies and social challenges of youth crime with lots of examples and case studies. The focus will be on the United Kingdom but with significant comparative analysis to show you similarities and differences in how youth crime is framed. 

You will explore the considerable changes in the governance and perceived legitimacy of the police service, its accountability and the relationships with the public whose consent is sought for policing over the last 50 years. You will relate the development of policing to wider systems of formal and informal social control relate and explore changes over time. You will discuss the range of interactions of the police with other institutions of social control in modern society such as welfare, education, health, or even financial agencies as well as newer forms of private policing.  

Getting meaningful work is probably one of your key aim when you graduate. Work and employment are also one of the central areas of interest across the social sciences. You will explore your current and future career aspirations, develop a CV and be able to undertake a work placement of work shadowing. You will also complete the Future me programme at the university of Suffolk as part of the module.

This module examines the nature of social justice and the range of policies that have sought to make societies fairer. You will study different conceptions of social justice, including the conceptions advanced Rawls and Sen. The module also explores the welfare state and some of the major policies used to try and increase social justice across a range of dimensions, including housing, education, health, income transfers, pensions and access to legal rights. You will also evaluate the effectiveness of social policies in a variety of countries increasing social justice using international data and evidence. 

In this module you will produce a final year project that allows you to exercise your independent judgement and skills in the development and execution of a project or dissertation relevant to your field of study. Under the supervision of an assigned tutor, the module provides you with the opportunity to independently apply the core subject knowledge and skills developed over the course of your degree. Over the course of the year you will undertake independent analysis and research, and communicate and present it to high professional standards. This project can take the form of a traditional research dissertation, but you also have the flexibility to undertake an alternative, such as a reflective report based on an independent project pursued in a practice / work setting. 

This module introduces the sociological perspective to the discussion about and the debates on mental illness and the development of the psychiatric treatment and services. The module is focussed on the way policy relates to practice. You will explore historical records of local asylums and hospitals with a field trip to explore previous asylums as part of the module.

Debates about gender and sexuality are global public issues that link private, intimate life with politics, violence and abuse. Great complexity surrounds gender and sexuality in contemporary society and culture and you will explore contemporary academic research in this area to clarify and discuss some of the key debates.  

Victims of Crime allows you to recognise the extent, patterns and impact of victimisation which is fundamental to enable informed discussion regarding crime and deviance. Through exploring the concept of victimisation, the experience of crime victims and developments in response to them, you will have the opportunity to broaden their understanding of contemporary crime and criminal justice. 

The module explores key issues, themes and debates from the field of drugs, crime and society. You will explore established and more recent academic and policy debates surrounding drug use, regulation and criminalisation. It is expected that you will come to the module with a 'taken-for-granted' perspective on the nature of drugs, their links with crime, and their wider social consequences and the module aims to challenge some of these. 

Penology considers both custodial and non-custodial punishment and various issues and dilemmas that might derive from penal intervention. You will explore issues such as the ‘Americanisation’ of the penal system and the impact of prison privatisation alongside assessing the ethos and effectiveness of incarceration. 

This module will develop your skills in processing large and complex datasets in the social sciences and visualise analysis to distil and convey findings to wide audiences. The module explores the key principles which make for effective data visualisation and communication, and the core workflows involved in processing, analysing and visualising data using appropriate software tools. In addition to developing your skills and competencies in analysing and presenting quantitative data, the module critically examines how quantitative data is used in the social sciences and how its use and presentation affects the development and evaluation of public policy. 

Course Modules 2024

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend' - more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.

For this course all modules are assessed and a range of assessment methods are used, including essays, reports, case studies, videos, portfolios, critiques, presentations, reviews and examinations. 

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.
Fingerprint on transparent surface

This module gives you a solid foundation in criminology using a topic-based approach. You will examine how we can make sense of crime and criminality and explore key areas of debate and controversy within the discipline of criminology. Crime dominates much discussion on the political and social stage and this module enables you to take part and contribute to these public discussions in an informed and knowledgeable way. You will be able to discuss the cause and nature of crime and criminality. Important practical data skills of mapping crime data are a key part in this module.  

This module aims to introduce you to key features of the sociological perspective and what many call the sociological imagination. It is concerned with making the everyday strange and the far away near to gain a better grasp on key aspects of social life. This leads into a key concern of sociology with questions of power and inequality. Students will be able to engage with key debates about the nature of inequality and power using contemporary examples and analysis. 

This module introduces you to key university academic skills to set yourself up for the rest of your degree. You will develop your academic skills through practical activities and tasks that relate to your degree. You will also explore core concepts and principles that underpin research in the social sciences. The module has a developmental approach to learning and teaching reinforced through regularly meetings in small groups with your tutor 

This module describes and explains some of the major social changes over the past 30-40 years using data and ideas. You will study patterns of wider change alongside an exploration of the impact on personal biography, life-satisfaction and wellbeing. You will study the rapid changes in East Asia, the differences with Europe and ways we can think through long term trends in how we live. Learning is organised through a problem-solving approach to get to grips with ideas and data in areas of change as diverse as wellbeing, fertility, family, work, migration and technology.  

Contemporary criminal justice is shaped by the past and this module provides you with the historical context to better understand contemporary criminological debates. You will have an introduction to the history of crime, crime control and punishment in England and Wales, Europe, the Islamic and Asian world as well as ancient Rome and Greece. The module reflects the interdisciplinary nature of criminology. Using scholarship from criminology, philosophy and humanities the module will locate contemporary debates within a wider historical context and help you develop a critical understanding of today’s crime issues and questions.  

The human story is a moving story, and we are migratory beings. This module will help you explore the history of people’s movement across the globe. You will explore the causes of migration, its voluntary and forced forms, asylum seeking and the main current global patterns of migration.  

This module grounds you in the principles of social science research and methods employed to find out about our social world. You will explore the research process and focus on specific methods that interest you and relate to your field of study. This will include being able develop and analyse social surveys and questionnaires, use interviews, and explore already existing data sources. You will gain the knowledge, skills and confidence to undertake independent, ethical and robust research in the social sciences. This module is an important steppingstone to your final year independent project module. 

Social theory allows you to dig deep into the big questions in our social world about how power works, what is the glue that keeps society together most of the time and how and why do societies change. You will harness the power of thinking theoretically to be creative, tackle contemporary issues and open new insights into your social world. We will do this through the ideas of important theorists from the late 20th and early 21st centuries, a few will be familiar like Weber, Du Bois or Durkheim but many new such as Archer, Latour, Chodorow or Luhmann. You will engage with the insightful, often challenging and sometimes counter-intuitive perspectives that come from a range of contemporary social theorists. 

The module aims to equip students to get behind the ‘woolliness’ of much popular discussion of globalization. For many commentators globalisation is the major force behind social, economic, political and cultural change over the past 30 years. It is also a much-misunderstood concept that provokes much heated debate between those who argue free markets are the motor of globalization to the constant benefit of humankind, and anti-globalization critics who see many of the world’s ills stemming from the increase in globalization.. On this module you will need to analyse the arguments, look at the data and make an informed decision about where you stand.  

Being able to answer why questions about crime and deviance is an essential part of the study of criminology. This module builds upon the foundations laid in the module Introduction to Criminology. You will explore the range of theories used to explain crime and criminal behaviour and the theoretical debates around three broad levels of criminological explanation: the individual, the situational, and the structural. You will also explore more recent approaches that centre on green crime and the relationship to wider society and a range of political and social issues.  

This module examines youth crime from competing criminological perspectives. It evaluates the association between young people and crime in historical, sociological and legal perspective. You will explore how social constructions of youth and crime shaped criminal justice policy and systems. You will develop and in-depth consideration of the procedures, policies and social challenges of youth crime with lots of examples and case studies. The focus will be on the United Kingdom but with significant comparative analysis to show you similarities and differences in how youth crime is framed. 

You will explore the considerable changes in the governance and perceived legitimacy of the police service, its accountability and the relationships with the public whose consent is sought for policing over the last 50 years. You will relate the development of policing to wider systems of formal and informal social control relate and explore changes over time. You will discuss the range of interactions of the police with other institutions of social control in modern society such as welfare, education, health, or even financial agencies as well as newer forms of private policing.  

Getting meaningful work is probably one of your key aim when you graduate. Work and employment are also one of the central areas of interest across the social sciences. You will explore your current and future career aspirations, develop a CV and be able to undertake a work placement of work shadowing. You will also complete the Future me programme at the university of Suffolk as part of the module.

This module examines the nature of social justice and the range of policies that have sought to make societies fairer. You will study different conceptions of social justice, including the conceptions advanced Rawls and Sen. The module also explores the welfare state and some of the major policies used to try and increase social justice across a range of dimensions, including housing, education, health, income transfers, pensions and access to legal rights. You will also evaluate the effectiveness of social policies in a variety of countries increasing social justice using international data and evidence. 

In this module you will produce a final year project that allows you to exercise your independent judgement and skills in the development and execution of a project or dissertation relevant to your field of study. Under the supervision of an assigned tutor, the module provides you with the opportunity to independently apply the core subject knowledge and skills developed over the course of your degree. Over the course of the year you will undertake independent analysis and research, and communicate and present it to high professional standards. This project can take the form of a traditional research dissertation, but you also have the flexibility to undertake an alternative, such as a reflective report based on an independent project pursued in a practice / work setting. 

This module introduces the sociological perspective to the discussion about and the debates on mental illness and the development of the psychiatric treatment and services. The module is focussed on the way policy relates to practice. You will explore historical records of local asylums and hospitals with a field trip to explore previous asylums as part of the module.

Debates about gender and sexuality are global public issues that link private, intimate life with politics, violence and abuse. Great complexity surrounds gender and sexuality in contemporary society and culture and you will explore contemporary academic research in this area to clarify and discuss some of the key debates.  

Victims of Crime allows you to recognise the extent, patterns and impact of victimisation which is fundamental to enable informed discussion regarding crime and deviance. Through exploring the concept of victimisation, the experience of crime victims and developments in response to them, you will have the opportunity to broaden their understanding of contemporary crime and criminal justice. 

The module explores key issues, themes and debates from the field of drugs, crime and society. You will explore established and more recent academic and policy debates surrounding drug use, regulation and criminalisation. It is expected that you will come to the module with a 'taken-for-granted' perspective on the nature of drugs, their links with crime, and their wider social consequences and the module aims to challenge some of these. 

Penology considers both custodial and non-custodial punishment and various issues and dilemmas that might derive from penal intervention. You will explore issues such as the ‘Americanisation’ of the penal system and the impact of prison privatisation alongside assessing the ethos and effectiveness of incarceration. 

This module will develop your skills in processing large and complex datasets in the social sciences and visualise analysis to distil and convey findings to wide audiences. The module explores the key principles which make for effective data visualisation and communication, and the core workflows involved in processing, analysing and visualising data using appropriate software tools. In addition to developing your skills and competencies in analysing and presenting quantitative data, the module critically examines how quantitative data is used in the social sciences and how its use and presentation affects the development and evaluation of public policy. 

Waterfront Building reflecting in the marina

WHY SUFFOLK

16th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Best Facilities 2023

WUSCA 2023

5th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Career Prospects 2023

WUSCA 2023

14th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Student Support 2023

WUSCA 2023
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Inside the Waterfront Building
Boats on the marina in front of the Waterfront Building
The Waterfront Building on Ipswich Marina
Bookshelves and step ladder
The Library
A student sitting with a laptop
SU Social Space

Entry Requirements

home-masthead-th

Career Opportunities

Criminology and Sociology graduates are in demand and well placed to seek employment in graduate management schemes, social services, education, marketing, criminal justice, welfare services, government, counselling, charities and the voluntary sector. 

Around 60% of graduate jobs are open to graduates of any discipline and Criminology and Sociology graduates are well equipped with advanced data and analytical skills and the confidence to thrive in many occupations. 

Recent graduates have gone on to work as teachers, college lecturers, housing officers, probation officers, police officers, prison officers, employment consultants, and English as a foreign language teachers.

Social science degrees are a valuable asset in the labour market. The skills most in demand by employers are communication, problem solving and creativity, research and analysis (1000 business leaders surveyed by Harvard Business Review).

The fastest growing areas of the economy employ more graduates from the arts, humanities and social science than other disciplines. 83% of people work in the service sector in the UK.

Your Course Team

David James

David is an Associate Professor in Sociology and Course Leader for Sociology with a keen interest in social change, social theory and the study of materiality.

David James staff profile photo

Dr Alina Rzepnikowska Phillips

Alina's teaching and research interests focus on race, ethnicity, migration, racism and xenophobia, conviviality and gender.

Alina Rzepnikowska Phillips staff profile photo

Laura Polley

Laura is Lecturer in Criminology and previously worked as a Prison Officer.

Laura Polley staff profile photo

Scott Huntly

Scott is a lecturer in politics and researches political discourse and ideology.

Dr Shamser Sinha

Shamser's research and teaching interests circle around; ‘race’ and racism; youth; and different ways of doing ethnography.

Shamser Sinha staff profile photo

Dr Isabella Calder

Dr Isabella Calder is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology whose research includes work around the use of top-up shops and justice and security.

Dr Duncan Weaver

Duncan is Senior Lecturer in Criminology.

Duncan Weaver staff profile photo

Laura Polley

Laura is Lecturer in Criminology and previously worked as a Prison Officer.

Laura Polley staff profile photo

Liz Jones

Liz is a lecturer in Criminology.

Liz Jones staff profile photo

Dr Paul Andell

Dr Paul Andell has more than 25 years of experience of working in the criminal justice field, and is now Associate Professor in Criminology at Suffolk.

Paul Andell staff profile photo

Dr Stuart Lipscombe

Stuart has been a Lecturer at University of Suffolk since 2014 and is also an alumnus of the University.

Stuart Lipscombe staff profile photo

Fees and Funding

UK Full-time Tuition Fee

£9,250

per year
UK Part-time Tuition Fee

£1,454*

per 20 credit module
International Full-time Tuition Fee

£14,610

per year

*Please contact the Student Centre for further details

The decision to study a degree is an investment into your future, there are various means of support available to you in order to help fund your tuition fees and living costs. You can apply for funding from the Spring before your course starts.

UK Fees and Finance UK Bursaries and Scholarships International Fees and Scholarships

Ipswich Award

The University of Suffolk is offering a £1,000 Award for students joining the University of Suffolk’s Ipswich campus. The Award is based on specific eligibility criteria based on your year of entry.

More information
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How to Apply

To study this course on a full-time basis, you can apply through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

Apply Now Further Information on Applying
A silhouette of a student in their cap and gown

Dana Bobolicu, BSc (Hons) Criminology and Sociology

"I feel that studying social sciences has expanded my horizons and way of thinking. I have learned to see things from a different perspective and developed a critical thinking about what I see and interact with."

read more
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