STUDY

Undergraduate

BA (Hons) Digital Film Production

Film lighting fixture close up
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: P300
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: P300
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Course information table
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: P300
Start date: September 2025
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Course information table
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: P300
Start date: September 2025
Course information table
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)

Overview

Our contemporary curriculum on BA (Hons) Digital Film Production combines the main elements of production, screenwriting, and film theory.  We give you the necessary creative, technical, critical, and entrepreneurial skills to succeed in this competitive, but hugely inspiring, industry. 

  • Get year-round access to professional film kit, including Canon DSLR, Sony FS5, Blackmagic Ursa and ARRI ALEXA Mini LF cameras. 
  • Learn post-production with industry-standard software AVID and ProTools. 
  • Access our dedicated film facilities, including a large film studio, film editing lab, colour grading suite and 5.1 audio post-production studio. 
  • Benefit from small class sizes, exceptional one-to-one tutor support and professional practice opportunities throughout the course. 
  • Access to free Masterclass interviews with Film and TV award winning industry professionals who share their experience, knowledge and passion.

Student Films

Taking a holistic and practical approach, we enable you to explore the professional aspects of filmmaking and learn every stage of the production process. 

Unlike many other university courses, we put a lot of emphasis on production and post-production sound. You explore it in a creative way, learning how to edit dialogue and apply sound effects, for instance. 

Throughout the degree you work with industry-standard software and equipment, ensuring you are fully prepared to enter into this profession. 

View student work.

Film Kit and Facilities

Our course is designed to reflect the real world; we provide opportunities for industry placements within the creative industries at organisations such as the BBC and at a variety of local production companies. You can also sharpen your skills by producing films for clients; students have worked with Suffolk County Council, Suffolk Shorts and the National Trust to name just a few. 

You will be taught by experienced teachers who remain active as practitioners and scholars of international renown. This is further augmented by masterclasses by recognised specialists in direction, artist-filmmaking, cinematography and documentary. In recent years, Christopher Andrews, Nick Gordon-Smith, and Holger Mohaupt have provided invaluable insight into their own careers and achievements, inspiring our next generation of filmmakers. 

As a result of our comprehensive course content and teaching, you will graduate with a full repertory of production and post-production skills, combined with a critical appreciation of many forms of filmmaking. This will prepare you for an ever-changing and competitive global workplace. 

The University of Suffolk is world-class and committed to our region. We are proudly modern and innovative and we believe in transformative education. We are on the rise with a focus on student satisfaction, graduate prospects, spending on academic services and student facilities.

1st

in the UK for student satisfaction for Art and Design courses

(The Complete University Guide 2024)

6th

in the UK for spend on academic services

(The Complete University Guide 2024)

11th

in the UK for social inclusion

(The Good University Guide 2023)

Course Modules

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend', more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.   

In the first year, you are introduced to both practical and critical approaches to your work and you start to develop your own professional portfolio.

In the second year, you further develop critical and analytical skills and conceptual and audio-visual creativity, resulting in the making and production of short films.

In your final year, there is a stronger focus on negotiated elements of work including a critical dissertation or research project and an independent short film project where students choose a genre. You also undertake our Professional Practice module.

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.

This module introduces creative digital filmmaking practice and is designed to encourage a flexible, informed, imaginative and reflective approach to practical work. Above all, this module introduces students to the basics of camera, lighting, sound and post-production, so that good working practices are established in order to aid the student’s progression over the three-year course.

This module reinforces and develops key filmmaking skills learnt in Digital Film Production: Introduction Part One, with a greater emphasis on the creation and realisation of a single project. Throughout the module students will be encouraged to adopt an ‘ideas-led’ approach to filmmaking, drawing and building upon their work in the Developing Screen Ideas module.

This introductory module is designed to stimulate the student’s intellectual curiosity. It will develop the student’s critical knowledge and skills base in ways which complement and inform their conceptual and practical work. The first six weeks focusses on the critical analysis of mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. In the second half of the module students investigate issues of race and representation, with particular reference to mainstream American cinema.

This introductory module is coupled with and follows directly on from Film Studies One, and as such continues to develop students' critical knowledge and skills base in ways which complement and inform their conceptual and practical work. The module introduces Film History as an academic discipline, provides the student with a toolkit of concepts for the close analysis of a range of film texts and genres and sets the student on the path of historical and contextual enquiry through the study of a diverse range of films from around the world.

During this module students learn the fundamentals of recording sound for picture and the role of the sound mixer in film production. By shooting their own short films, students learn how to shoot both single-system and double-system footage and how to log, synchronise and edit that footage. 

This module introduces students to the developmental process in filmmaking and is fundamentally concerned with the generation of ideas and the creative processes involved in their realisation. Initially, students explore key concepts and practices in screenwriting, critically analysing narrative structure, story types and themes, conflict, action, character, dialogue, genre and style. This critical study is complemented by screenwriting tasks on action, character, dialogue and genre, which will be included in students’ portfolios.

The module addresses theoretical and critical approaches to the study of film texts and provides a preparation for students’ own independent research at Level 6 when formulating their research proposal for the Dissertation.  Focusing on a range of film theories, approaches and methods which have been influential in the development of Film as a field of academic study, it will enable students to examine various ideas, assumptions and procedures and try them out on a diverse range of films.  

This module explores the theory and practice of writing for the screen, specifically the ten-minute short.  Students will engage with key practical manuals and critical studies of the screenwriting process and study a range of globally diverse shorts.  The culmination of this work will be the production of a ten-page screenplay which will be put forward for selection to be made in the level five Digital Film Production: Drama module in semester two.

This module enables students to explore alternatives to mainstream cinema which have attracted the label avant-garde, experimental, underground or alternative. Building on work done in previous critical and practical modules and also complementing the concurrent Level 5 ones, the module aims to expand students’ theoretical, critical, practical and creative horizons by engaging them with a range of work and filmmaking modes which may be unfamiliar.

This module develops the Level 4 digital film work by deepening students’ engagement with the medium through practical engagement with the many different forms of documentary story-telling. Analysis of contrasting examples from the practice across several continents in combination with short exercises will culminate in the production of a documentary short film to be made in small groups.

Students work in small crews to produce ten-minute short films based on the screenplays written in the Screenwriting: The Ten-Minute Short module. Students develop their understanding and knowledge of narrative based drama and the possibilities and limitations of the short film form.  Students are encouraged to be innovative in their use of the form and produce both conceptually and visually creative content. 

This module forms an introduction to the key concepts, methodologies and techniques of audio postproduction for film. In the first assignment, students design a soundtrack for a short animated film extract using Pro Tools software, applying level balancing, stereo imaging, equalization and reverb to tracks that they have imported and synchronised to picture.  Their second practical project requires them to: write, shoot and edit a short, ‘sound driven’ film. By putting this film through audio postproduction students are suitably equipped to record, edit and engineer the soundtracks for their own and each other’s films during the remainder of their studies and beyond.

This year-long module represents the culmination of students’ critical development on the course. It provides an opportunity for students to explore a chosen area of Film Studies. They design and carry out a sustained and coherent piece of independent research in an area of scholarship that they wish to pursue.

This module is the culmination of students’ conceptual, practical and creative development on the course. Students are expected to critically evaluate the ideas generated in the Level 6 Development and Pre-production: Final Project module, in order to select the most original and physically feasible concept for a film which they will make independently on digital film. 

This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake professional digital film work for clients and/or a work placement. Through the wide variety of opportunities available, students develop the knowledge and skills that underpin their own creative, professional and personal self-development. Building on Level 4 and 5 production modules, this module prepares students for professional life after graduation and establishes the skills and resources needed to develop a sustainable practice and work in either a self-employed or employed capacity.

This module builds on students’ knowledge of the development and pre-production processes in filmmaking and is fundamentally concerned with the generation of ideas and the creative and practical processes involved in their realisation. Students develop ideas for a short drama, documentary or experimental film, choosing which one(s) they wish to progress and produce as their final project in semester two.

Course Modules

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend', more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.   

In the first year, you are introduced to both practical and critical approaches to your work and you start to develop your own professional portfolio.

In the second year, you further develop critical and analytical skills and conceptual and audio-visual creativity, resulting in the making and production of short films.

In your final year, there is a stronger focus on negotiated elements of work including a critical dissertation or research project and an independent short film project where students choose a genre. You also undertake our Professional Practice module.

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.

This module introduces creative digital filmmaking practice and is designed to encourage a flexible, informed, imaginative and reflective approach to practical work. Above all, this module introduces students to the basics of camera, lighting, sound and post-production, so that good working practices are established in order to aid the student’s progression over the three-year course.

This module reinforces and develops key filmmaking skills learnt in Digital Film Production: Introduction Part One, with a greater emphasis on the creation and realisation of a single project. Throughout the module students will be encouraged to adopt an ‘ideas-led’ approach to filmmaking, drawing and building upon their work in the Developing Screen Ideas module.

This introductory module is designed to stimulate the student’s intellectual curiosity. It will develop the student’s critical knowledge and skills base in ways which complement and inform their conceptual and practical work. The first six weeks focusses on the critical analysis of mise-en-scene, cinematography, sound and editing. In the second half of the module students investigate issues of race and representation, with particular reference to mainstream American cinema.

This introductory module is coupled with and follows directly on from Film Studies One, and as such continues to develop students' critical knowledge and skills base in ways which complement and inform their conceptual and practical work. The module introduces Film History as an academic discipline, provides the student with a toolkit of concepts for the close analysis of a range of film texts and genres and sets the student on the path of historical and contextual enquiry through the study of a diverse range of films from around the world.

During this module students learn the fundamentals of recording sound for picture and the role of the sound mixer in film production. By shooting their own short films, students learn how to shoot both single-system and double-system footage and how to log, synchronise and edit that footage. 

This module introduces students to the developmental process in filmmaking and is fundamentally concerned with the generation of ideas and the creative processes involved in their realisation. Initially, students explore key concepts and practices in screenwriting, critically analysing narrative structure, story types and themes, conflict, action, character, dialogue, genre and style. This critical study is complemented by screenwriting tasks on action, character, dialogue and genre, which will be included in students’ portfolios.

The module addresses theoretical and critical approaches to the study of film texts and provides a preparation for students’ own independent research at Level 6 when formulating their research proposal for the Dissertation.  Focusing on a range of film theories, approaches and methods which have been influential in the development of Film as a field of academic study, it will enable students to examine various ideas, assumptions and procedures and try them out on a diverse range of films.  

This module explores the theory and practice of writing for the screen, specifically the ten-minute short.  Students will engage with key practical manuals and critical studies of the screenwriting process and study a range of globally diverse shorts.  The culmination of this work will be the production of a ten-page screenplay which will be put forward for selection to be made in the level five Digital Film Production: Drama module in semester two.

This module enables students to explore alternatives to mainstream cinema which have attracted the label avant-garde, experimental, underground or alternative. Building on work done in previous critical and practical modules and also complementing the concurrent Level 5 ones, the module aims to expand students’ theoretical, critical, practical and creative horizons by engaging them with a range of work and filmmaking modes which may be unfamiliar.

This module develops the Level 4 digital film work by deepening students’ engagement with the medium through practical engagement with the many different forms of documentary story-telling. Analysis of contrasting examples from the practice across several continents in combination with short exercises will culminate in the production of a documentary short film to be made in small groups.

Students work in small crews to produce ten-minute short films based on the screenplays written in the Screenwriting: The Ten-Minute Short module. Students develop their understanding and knowledge of narrative based drama and the possibilities and limitations of the short film form.  Students are encouraged to be innovative in their use of the form and produce both conceptually and visually creative content. 

This module forms an introduction to the key concepts, methodologies and techniques of audio postproduction for film. In the first assignment, students design a soundtrack for a short animated film extract using Pro Tools software, applying level balancing, stereo imaging, equalization and reverb to tracks that they have imported and synchronised to picture.  Their second practical project requires them to: write, shoot and edit a short, ‘sound driven’ film. By putting this film through audio postproduction students are suitably equipped to record, edit and engineer the soundtracks for their own and each other’s films during the remainder of their studies and beyond.

This year-long module represents the culmination of students’ critical development on the course. It provides an opportunity for students to explore a chosen area of Film Studies. They design and carry out a sustained and coherent piece of independent research in an area of scholarship that they wish to pursue.

This module is the culmination of students’ conceptual, practical and creative development on the course. Students are expected to critically evaluate the ideas generated in the Level 6 Development and Pre-production: Final Project module, in order to select the most original and physically feasible concept for a film which they will make independently on digital film. 

This module provides an opportunity for students to undertake professional digital film work for clients and/or a work placement. Through the wide variety of opportunities available, students develop the knowledge and skills that underpin their own creative, professional and personal self-development. Building on Level 4 and 5 production modules, this module prepares students for professional life after graduation and establishes the skills and resources needed to develop a sustainable practice and work in either a self-employed or employed capacity.

This module builds on students’ knowledge of the development and pre-production processes in filmmaking and is fundamentally concerned with the generation of ideas and the creative and practical processes involved in their realisation. Students develop ideas for a short drama, documentary or experimental film, choosing which one(s) they wish to progress and produce as their final project in semester two.

Waterfront Building reflecting in the marina

WHY SUFFOLK

2nd in the UK for Career Prospects

WUSCA 2024

3rd in the UK for spend on academic services

Complete University Guide 2025

4th in the UK for Teaching Satisfaction

Guardian University Guide 2024
Close-up of student with video camera
Digital Film Production Student
Student and lecturer in sound booth
BA (Hons) Digital Film Production
Students standing behind a video camera
Digital Film Production Students
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Arts Building Virtual Tour

Entry Requirements

Entry Requirements

home-masthead-th

Career Opportunities

Because of our excellent standards and practical experience with our industry partners such as BBC, ITV and independent production companies, our graduates are prepared to take on exciting industry jobs. In fact, some go on to work for big names such as Warner Bros and Pinewood Studios

To heighten your employability, we strongly encourage you to gain professional experience throughout your degree – during holidays for example.

Since our course modules cover all key aspects of film, you leave university with a host of transferable skills. So you have the option of a pursuing a career in film or a job in the broader broadcast landscape.

BFI Film Academy

Students also have the opportunity to help industry professionals deliver the BFI Academy Short Film Course by working as paid assistants in workshops and on film shoots - find out more information on the BFI Academy Short Film Course.

Your Course Team

Dr Alexandra Leaney

Alexandra teaches Digital Film Production and Screenwriting, holding two MAs and a PHD. Her work includes analysis of screenplays and child protagonists.

Dr Helena Bacon

Helena has taught on courses at many different universities. Her specialisms include gothic and horror fiction and film, contemporary fiction and television.

Helena Bacon staff profile photo

Daniel Hayes

Daniel is an award-winning screenwriter and script consultant with over fifteen years’ experience in the film industry. He lectures in Digital Film Production.

Daniel Hayes staff profile photo

Piers Storey

Piers is a lecturer in Digital Film Production, and has worked on various drama and documentary films, including those broadcast on BBC2 and Channel 4.

Dr Hing Tsang

Hing Tsang is a senior lecturer in Digital Film Production. He has worked as a technician in the TV and film industry and has written on documentary and fiction

Dr Emily Richardson

The films of filmmaker and lecturer Emily Richardson have been shown in galleries and festivals internationally, including FACT Liverpool and the Tate Modern.

Fees and Funding

UK Full-time Tuition Fee

£9,250

per year
UK Part-time Tuition Fee

£1,454*

per 20 credit module
International Full-time Tuition Fee

£15,210

per year

*Please contact the Student Centre for further details

The decision to study a degree is an investment into your future, there are various means of support available to you in order to help fund your tuition fees and living costs. You can apply for funding from the Spring before your course starts.

UK Fees and Finance UK Bursaries and Scholarships International Fees and Scholarships

Fees and Funding

UK Full-time Tuition Fee*

£9,250

per year
UK Part-time Tuition Fee*

£1,454*

per 20 credit module

* Maximum tuition fees chargeable to Home-fee students are set by the UK Government normally in the autumn or early winter in the year prior to the year of entry (e.g. autumn 2024 for entry in 2025/26). The University of Suffolk reserves the right to increase tuition fees for 2025/26 if the UK Government increases the maximum annual fee. International tuition fees for 2025/26 will be confirmed and updated here in May 2024.

The decision to study a degree is an investment into your future, there are various means of support available to you in order to help fund your tuition fees and living costs. You can apply for funding from the Spring before your course starts.

UK Fees and Finance UK Bursaries and Scholarships International Fees and Scholarships

Ipswich Award

The University of Suffolk is offering a £1,000 Award for students joining the University of Suffolk’s Ipswich campus. The Award is based on specific eligibility criteria based on your year of entry.

More information
A group of students walking down a stairwell

How to Apply

To study this course on a full-time basis, you can apply through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

Apply Now Further Information on Applying
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Kate McCoid, BA (Hons) Digital Film Production

“I used to dream of working on a Wes Anderson film at University, now I have thanks to University of Suffolk”

read more

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