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BA (Hons) Childhood

Clearing

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UCAS code: 
X300
Institution code: 
S82
Location: 
Ipswich

Duration: 

Full-time: Three years

Part-time: Six years

Course Options: 
Professional Placement
Typical Offer: 

112 UCAS tariff points (or above),
BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC)

The BA (Hons) Childhood programme explores the well-established academic discipline of Childhood Studies. The programme focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of the study of childhood, which embraces diverse academic disciplines such as sociology, education, psychology, history, philosophy, social policy and health. Such inclusion allows for the diverse, multi-faceted experiences of children to be explored, contextualised and interrogated through application of social science perspectives. This approach has a proven record in supporting you to develop and follow particular interests in this diverse field. 

If you don’t meet the above entry requirements, we may still be able to consider you. If you’re interested in applying, call our Clearing Hotline to discuss your suitability for study. 

Introduction

The BA (Hons) Childhood programme embraces an interdisciplinary, multifaceted philosophy which offers an expansive platform upon which to critically explore childhoods and children’s lives.  

The programme focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of the study of childhood, which embraces diverse academic disciplines such as sociology, education, psychology, history, philosophy, social policy and health. In the later years of study, you will have the opportunity to acquire specific knowledge and understanding in specialised aspects of childhood and their associated career opportunities through one of three discreet pathways. These pathways will be specifically named in the final degree award. 

  • Pathway 1: Disability, Health and Wellbeing: offers a grounding in human development from an ecological perspective; health, well-being; and disability, from both a bio-psycho-social perspective and the disability-studies, rights-based approach. 

  • Pathway 2: Education: examines early and primary education and the underpinning values of professional practice. Practice modules are available within this pathway. You can work towards an optional Early Childhood Graduate Competencies certification, developed by the Early Childhood Degree Network (ECSDN) and supported by the Department for Education (DfE).  

  • Pathway 3: Society and Welfare: examines welfare ideologies and the ways in which childhood is constructed within the social structures. It explores the welfare needs of children through local, national and international institutions. 

 

On this course, you will engage with children, understand their rights, listen to their experiences, and prioritise these without imagining to be fully cognisant of the child’s world. You will be equipped to do this through an extensive range of modules, which build on a diversity of social sciences without privileging one perspective over another. Through this array of lenses, you will interrogate contemporary issues and debates within childhood from local, national and international contexts.  

An in-depth understanding of diversity and difference in children and childhoods will enabling you to develop, adopt and champion inclusive and participatory attitudes and practice throughout your studies and into your future career. We want to equip you with the skills to become change agents in your future organisations and communities.  

The academic team draws on years of academic and professional expertise in childhood, education, child health, development and therapeutic working. You will benefit from close working relationships with a highly qualified teaching team who will help you to explore and uncover the fascinating world of children and childhood. 

Course modules

Full-time students typically take five to six modules per year (a total of 120 credits). Part-time students may negotiate their programme of study with their tutors to suit their own individual needs and requirements. 

The first year provides a multi-disciplinary overview of childhood, child development, health, welfare and education. From the second year onwards, students can focus on one of the three distinct pathways: 

  • Pathway 1: Disability, Health and Wellbeing 
  • Pathway 2: Education 
  • Pathway 3: Society and Welfare 
Understanding University (requisite)

This module seeks to introduce students to academic study at university level. Its purpose is to enable students to reflect on and develop their skills as they progress through their first year of study. This is achieved by introducing students to the key study and academic skills required to succeed at university level study such as accessing, and evaluating academic source material, understanding argumentation and critical thinking, academic writing, and referencing. Students will also reflect on elements of academic resilience and employability. 

Health and Wellbeing (requisite)

This module introduces students to a range of subject areas and key debates surrounding the health/illness and wellbeing of children in the contemporary UK. The module presents students with several perspectives through which to view these ideas: biological, medical, social and environmental. The implications of poor health and illness on the child and the family help contextualise the dynamic roles of children in maintaining their own health.

Child Development in Context (requisite)

This module investigates the developing child and the changes that occur over time within the context of the family and wider social systems that children inhabit. The module has a particular focus on the aspects of child development that influence and are influenced by social context. It will include the psychological development of babies, children and young people within the family, education and the wider social systems; it seeks to explain how the interaction between biological, social and cultural factors affect lifelong patterns of change in the individual.

Childhood, Care and Education (requisite)

This module is an opportunity to introduce students to education and the underpinning values of professional practice with a particular focus on the historical, international and contemporary conceptualisations, policies and practices of care and education. Students will be encouraged to consider how the theoretical study of the child underpins the early years and primary curriculum and adult role.

Children in Society (requisite)

Within this module, students will be challenged to ask critical questions about their social world and explore their own individual and cultural experiences within a wider context. Throughout this module, students are encouraged to examine the common assumptions of childhood as a natural, universal, fixed, and inevitable life stage. By ‘thinking sociologically’, students will identify the social structures which define, govern, and locate children and childhood.

Diversity, Rights and Inclusion (requisite)

The module will address diversity, rights and inclusion in the broadest sense, addressing two core areas: childhood and barriers to participation/inclusion. Students will be encouraged to consider the intersectionalities of children and young people’s lives. Topics range from gender, poverty, ethnicity, disability, and socio-cultural diversity to identify and explore the differing perspectives and discourses. 

Children’s Ecologies (requisite)

This module will introduce students to a ‘systems’ thinking as applied to childhood and the development of the children. It will use an ecological model of human development to place children and childhoods into the wider and complex ‘system of systems’, micro, meso, exo and macro, and the dynamic of constancy and change of these systems in time. It will focus on topics such as the family system, family-school-community collaboration; school involvement, and will then engage in broader discussions on globalisation, legislation, educational systems, et caetera. The systems approach underlying the ecological model of human development is a theoretical framework that allows, and encourages, integration of other theoretical views into a multi-theoretical approach.

Safeguarding (requisite)

The module provides students with an historical policy context in which to understand the origins of safeguarding children and the social construction of abuse. The shifting power relations between the state, professionals, families and children is a core theme that is critically explored through an examination of the legal framework, particularly the Children Act (1989) and Children Act (2004) and also Child Abuse Inquiry reports. 

Reflecting contemporary safeguarding policy, the module explores the related themes of early intervention, prevention, and child protection as every professions responsibility. At the core of safeguarding children is developing a theoretical understanding of why children are abused, the ability to identify signs and symptoms, and understand the impact of abuse and neglect on children’s wellbeing. 

Understanding Research (requisite)

This module grounds students in the principles of social science research and methods employed to develop our understanding of the social world. The module covers core aspects of the research process and offers students opportunities to focus on particular methods of interest to them and relevant to their field of study. The module aims to provide students with the knowledge and confidence to undertake independent, ethical and robust research in the social sciences. This module also acts as a precursor to the dissertation module.

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Developmental Disabilities (optional)

The modern discourse on atypical development goes well beyond a narrow medical or clinical view, to incorporate the complex interactions with the larger contexts of family, society and culture. This module explores topics such as the historical shift from views of Impairment, Disability and Handicap toward Functioning, Activity and Participation, a range of developmental and other medical disabilities and the influence of atypical development on children’s ability to learn in the typical school context exploring the spectrum of Special Educational Needs (SEN). The module will also explore the influence of the social and cultural contexts on the developmental path of these children and their families, on the diagnosis process, and on the outcomes of the intervention. 

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Children’s Mental Health (optional)

The module provides opportunities to gain an understanding of children’s mental health from a holistic bio-psycho-social perspective. Understanding children’s mental health needs is crucial for practitioners working with children and young people as it has a significant impact on other areas of development, social and educational participation and inclusion.

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Principles of Intervention and Participation (optional)

Interventions are positioned as central to supporting children’s wellbeing and their ability to fulfil their potential. Therefore, the purpose of this module is to encourage students to explore and engage with current debates around child/family intervention and the possibilities of participation and inclusion. A range of interventions will be reviewed in the light of the holistic needs of children within an increasingly culturally diverse society and changing trends in supporting families. 

Children’s Ecologies (requisite)

This module will introduce students to a ‘systems’ thinking as applied to childhood and the development of the children. It will use an ecological model of human development to place children and childhoods into the wider and complex ‘system of systems’, micro, meso, exo and macro, and the dynamic of constancy and change of these systems in time. It will focus on topics such as the family system, family-school-community collaboration; school involvement, and will then engage in broader discussions on globalisation, legislation, educational systems, et caetera. The systems approach underlying the ecological model of human development is a theoretical framework that allows, and encourages, integration of other theoretical views into a multi-theoretical approach. 

Safeguarding (requisite)

The module provides students with an historical policy context in which to understand the origins of safeguarding children and the social construction of abuse. The shifting power relations between the state, professionals, families and children is a core theme that is critically explored through an examination of the legal framework, particularly the Children Act (1989) and Children Act (2004) and also Child Abuse Inquiry reports. 

Reflecting contemporary safeguarding policy, the module explores the related themes of early intervention, prevention, and child protection as every professions responsibility. At the core of safeguarding children is developing a theoretical understanding of why children are abused, the ability to identify signs and symptoms, and understand the impact of abuse and neglect on children’s wellbeing.

Understanding Research (requisite)

This module grounds students in the principles of social science research and methods employed to develop our understanding of the social world. The module covers core aspects of the research process and offers students opportunities to focus on particular methods of interest to them and relevant to their field of study. The module aims to provide students with the knowledge and confidence to undertake independent, ethical and robust research in the social sciences. This module also acts as a precursor to the dissertation module. 

Education Pathway: Language and Literacy (optional)

This module examines the complex relationship between cognition and communication, alongside the stages of children’s language and literacy development. The module further examines the development of ‘desirable literacies’ in young children: their spoken language, reading and writing. Theoretical explanations for the role of the adult in supporting and extending children’s language and literacy development are included as is an exploration of the factors and conceptual frameworks that influence practice contexts in both formal and informal educational settings. 

Education Pathway: SEN and Inclusive Education (optional)

This module provides an exploration of Special Educational Needs and Disabilities, and introduces students to a range of issues and perspectives in relation to SEN, disability and inclusion in general. The module poses questions regarding the social and cultural dimension of difference in learning needs, gender and culture and it seeks to allow students to critically evaluate perceptions of difference and inclusion. This module will also allow students to explore the principles of inclusive practice and to develop their understanding of how to implement more inclusive strategies and techniques in education.

Education Pathway: Creative Learning (optional)

This module focuses on understanding the value and role of creativity and play in childhood exploring the extent to which the two further children’s development through a variety of theoretical views. 

Students will be encouraged to reflect on and explore historical and contemporary perspectives on creativity from a cross-cultural perspective. The module will consider how other children and adults and the wider social context impact on the play decisions and creative choices children make. Students will learn about how children express themselves, connect with the physical and social world around them through creative activities and consider how all children can be included in creative experiences. 

Education Pathway: Developing Practice GP1 (optional)

This first practice module seeks to explore with students the underlying professional practices and principles of the early years and primary education. Students are encouraged to consider how the theoretical study of the child underpins the early and primary curriculum. The module will support students in adopting a professional approach to working with young children. The module is broadly split between taught sessions on campus and days spent in practice in educational setting. The ethos is to support students to develop core knowledge and skills in practice appropriate for working towards the role of graduate practitioner.

Children’s Ecologies (requisite)

This module will introduce students to a ‘systems’ thinking as applied to childhood and the development of the children. It will use an ecological model of human development to place children and childhoods into the wider and complex ‘system of systems’, micro, meso, exo and macro, and the dynamic of constancy and change of these systems in time. It will focus on topics such as the family system, family-school-community collaboration; school involvement, and will then engage in broader discussions on globalisation, legislation, educational systems, et caetera. The systems approach underlying the ecological model of human development is a theoretical framework that allows, and encourages, integration of other theoretical views into a multi-theoretical approach. 

Safeguarding (requisite)

The module provides students with an historical policy context in which to understand the origins of safeguarding children and the social construction of abuse. The shifting power relations between the state, professionals, families and children is a core theme that is critically explored through an examination of the legal framework, particularly the Children Act (1989) and Children Act (2004) and also Child Abuse Inquiry reports. 

Reflecting contemporary safeguarding policy, the module explores the related themes of early intervention, prevention, and child protection as every professions responsibility. At the core of safeguarding children is developing a theoretical understanding of why children are abused, the ability to identify signs and symptoms, and understand the impact of abuse and neglect on children’s wellbeing.

Understanding Research (requisite)

This module grounds students in the principles of social science research and methods employed to develop our understanding of the social world. The module covers core aspects of the research process and offers students opportunities to focus on particular methods of interest to them and relevant to their field of study. The module aims to provide students with the knowledge and confidence to undertake independent, ethical and robust research in the social sciences. This module also acts as a precursor to the dissertation module. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Sex and Gender in British Society since 1500 (optional)

This module offers students the opportunity to study the role of sex and gender in the lives of British men and women over the past five hundred years, and to question the extent to which both informed the lives of Britons. It provides a historical context to understandings of gendered identity and its consequences for families, parents, children, the law, citizenship, bodies and selfhood.

Society and Welfare Pathway: Alternative Perspectives of Welfare in Childhood (optional)

In this module students evaluate changing perspectives of welfare provision which has historically shaped the structure of childhood. Perspectives applied by those in authority have shifted through discourses of state paternalism, individualised responsibility, rights discourses, social investment and social threat. Each perspectives constructs an alternative childhood. In this module the social policies which have cared for, and controlled changing expectations of childhood will be highlighted, with particular significance placed on relevant policy provision surrounding children in deprivation, education, disability and the family. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Children’s Material Worlds (optional)

Often, we think of toys and child furniture as largely interchangeable objects in the serious work of play and learning; however this module will focus on the design history of “children’s things” and explore how these objects are used as vehicles for society’s attitudes toward childhood, identity, and development. This module will centre on treating children as citizens, rather than consumers, and offer critique of agenda-driven policies which fence-in children’s fun. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Childhood since 1500 (optional)

This module provides a historical analysis of the cultural situation of the child, with a particular consideration to the changing legal status and emergence of child protection legislation. This module considers how diverse experiences of childhood were shaped by social and cultural change over time, and affected by ideas about class, race, ethnicity and religion. Legislative changes, which had a slow but steady development until 1960, began accelerating, further defining and regulating an “ideal” childhood. This module also brings in the thoughts and feelings of children themselves through diaries, testimonies and oral histories, and use a wide range of sources to access the perspectives of adults, governments and nations.

Independent Project (requisite)

This module is designed for students to produce a final year projects that allows students to exercise their independent judgement and skills in the development and execution of a project or dissertation relevant to their field of study. Under the supervision of an assigned tutor, the module provides students with the opportunity to independently apply the core subject knowledge and skills developed over the course of their degree.

Decolonisation and Difference (requisite)

Drawing from postcolonial, subaltern, decolonial, post-qualitative and posthuman critiques, the module aims to explore the Southern “turn” to domains of knowledge - hierarchies, ‘production’, erasures and circulation - resulting in the deligitimisation of knowledges from the ‘rich peripheral countries’ to build an understanding of the impact of knowledge as capital. Engaging with this upsurge of interest in decolonisation within professional and academic environments will not only extend the University’s currency but importantly enrich students’ understanding of the current demand to decolonise educational and practice settings, and why acknowledging other knowledges and decolonisation matters, towards enabling a critical approach to future thinking and practice. In doing so, the module will interrogate what place curriculum and policies have within these calls for decolonising education and practice in the UK. 

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Contemporary Disability Studies (optional)

This module is aims to respond to contemporary issues in relation to disability and, more specifically, the lived experiences of children and young people with special educational needs and/or disabilities and their families in the context of current social, economic, cultural, political situation. The aim of this module is to provide students with an opportunity to explore contemporary issues of their choice that impact on the lives of children and young people with SEN/D. This may include for example birth decisions and the value of lives; children with SEN/D and friendships; sex and sexuality; the politics of family life; children and young people with SEN/D in art and visual cultures; the Para Olympics; work and employment; hate crime; or the impact of Covid-19.

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Therapies and Counselling (optional)

This module aims to provide students with a critical exploration of the nature of therapeutic interventions and counselling, and a critical exploration of conceptual models of therapeutic and counselling skills.  It explores differing perspectives, principles, ethical practice and current debates within this field. 

This module will also explore the basic principles of counselling approaches in children and families and the range of settings in which this can take place. Students will develop and reflect on basic helping skills and consider a range of key theories taking into account issues of difference.

Disability, Health and Wellbeing Pathway: Child Public Health (optional)

The module will introduce students to the basic principles and topics of public health, with a particular focus on topics that are relevant to children. Students will critically analyse health problems at a global, national and local level, and will develop knowledge and understanding of the strategies aimed at reducing health inequalities through coordinated actions. Health promotion and health protection principles will be explored; students will learn about health determinants, health inequalities, and the socio-economic causes of health and illness that arise from deprivation and poverty and on the drivers of the global burden of diseases and issues of inequity surrounding these.

Independent Project (requisite)

This module is designed for students to produce a final year projects that allows students to exercise their independent judgement and skills in the development and execution of a project or dissertation relevant to their field of study. Under the supervision of an assigned tutor, the module provides students with the opportunity to independently apply the core subject knowledge and skills developed over the course of their degree.

Decolonisation and Difference (requisite)

Drawing from postcolonial, subaltern, decolonial, post-qualitative and posthuman critiques, the module aims to explore the Southern “turn” to domains of knowledge - hierarchies, ‘production’, erasures and circulation - resulting in the deligitimisation of knowledges from the ‘rich peripheral countries’ to build an understanding of the impact of knowledge as capital. Engaging with this upsurge of interest in decolonisation within professional and academic environments will not only extend the University’s currency but importantly enrich students’ understanding of the current demand to decolonise educational and practice settings, and why acknowledging other knowledges and decolonisation matters, towards enabling a critical approach to future thinking and practice. In doing so, the module will interrogate what place curriculum and policies have within these calls for decolonising education and practice in the UK.

Education Pathway: Outdoor Learning and Environment Education (optional)

On this module students will explore how the outdoors and the environment can enhance a child's development and learning. Outdoor learning and Environmental Education are vital to a curriculum as we are living in a world where environmental concerns and issues about well-being are paramount. 

Students will gain an understanding of the importance of children learning outside the traditional space of the classroom and will consider creative ideas to incorporate outdoor activities for all children. Notions of spaces and places will be reflected upon with an in-depth analysis of rural experiences and urban environments and how both settings have a particular outdoor environment which can be utilised for outdoor learning. 

Education Pathway: Current Debates in Schooling (optional)

This module will enable students to develop their understanding of current debates and issues around schooling and education. Students will also examine a variety of formal and informal ways that children can receive schooling. Students will critically explore and evaluate how children participate in education in other ways apart from formal education at a school. Students will be introduced to key current topics and debates around children’s schooling and education and they will be given the opportunity to propose ideas for further improvement of these issues affecting children’s schooling.

Education Pathway: Children and STEM (optional)

This module will introduce students to key issues in mathematics, science and technology education, particularly those that relate to the years of compulsory schooling. Students will gain understanding of key curricular, pedagogical and social issues that relate to the teaching and learning of mathematics, science and technology which are crucial subject areas in the curriculum.

Education Pathway: Professional Practice GP2 (optional)

This second practice module is an opportunity for students to critically evaluate and reflect upon the values, theories and practical skills demanded of educational practitioners. The focus of this module is on the development of leadership skills in practice settings. Students will critically explore working in teams, change management, leadership styles and the measurement of quality in provision. The ethos is to support students in developing critical evaluative ways of working that enhance their ability to lead practice as they work towards the role of graduate practitioner. Drawing on theoretical ideas and empirical research students will demonstrate knowledge of leadership and management and its importance and application in democratic and inclusive practice.

Independent Project (requisite)

This module is designed for students to produce a final year projects that allows students to exercise their independent judgement and skills in the development and execution of a project or dissertation relevant to their field of study. Under the supervision of an assigned tutor, the module provides students with the opportunity to independently apply the core subject knowledge and skills developed over the course of their degree.  

Decolonisation and Difference (requisite)

Drawing from postcolonial, subaltern, decolonial, post-qualitative and posthuman critiques, the module aims to explore the Southern “turn” to domains of knowledge - hierarchies, ‘production’, erasures and circulation - resulting in the deligitimisation of knowledges from the ‘rich peripheral countries’ to build an understanding of the impact of knowledge as capital. Engaging with this upsurge of interest in decolonisation within professional and academic environments will not only extend the University’s currency but importantly enrich students’ understanding of the current demand to decolonise educational and practice settings, and why acknowledging other knowledges and decolonisation matters, towards enabling a critical approach to future thinking and practice. In doing so, the module will interrogate what place curriculum and policies have within these calls for decolonising education and practice in the UK. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Peripheral childhoods (optional)

This module in Peripheral Childhoods introduces students to the intersections of childhoods centring on those that have been marginalised, invisibilised or occur in contexts of multiple disadvantages. In particular, the module will critically examine the historical, international, and contemporary conceptualisations of childhood, the ‘ideal’ types, and normative benchmarks, policies, and practices, as advocated by dominant or Euro-American traditions. It will draw on the fields of childhood studies, developmental psychology, sociology, education, social policy and childhood geographies; and interrogate the historical, social, material and political conditions that shape childhoods ‘at’ and ‘on’ the peripheries. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Gendered Violence, Vulnerability and Voice (optional)

Recent decades have seen enormous progress on improving the lives of girls and women, however even where gender gaps have narrowed, systematic differences in outcomes still persist, including widespread gender-based violence and lack of voice. Sessions cover policy and legislative approaches, protection and prevention, promising practices in intervention, and definitions and framings, including feminist debates on equality, power, and control. This module aims to focus on the complex ways politics, social context, and frameworks can amplify – and also restrict – women and children’s voices and agency. 

Society and Welfare Pathway: Families and the State (optional)

This module explores families and the state in the broadest sense, addressing two core areas: the influence and impact of the state and subsequent policies which imped on the diversity of family formations and the recognition of ‘family’ beyond the dominant hegemonic nuclear module. Topics range from analysing the performance of the family to same-sexed parenting to adoptive families (internationally and nationally) and the child’s right to a family life and name. The module will take a critical perspective in analysing the construction and reconstruction of family formations and challenge previous dominant rhetoric’s to highlight the diversity and reality of family formations in the UK today and the role the state and welfare systems has within these different family formations.

Career opportunities

The Childhood programme and its pathways provides the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of childhood for students who aspire to work directly with children, their families and/or with the services that support them. Employability has always been central to the Childhood programme here at the University of Suffolk. We encourage all students to undertake work/practice experience in whatever form is most accessible and appropriate for the individual student.

The Childhood programme enables students to go into a range of careers working with children and their families as well as further graduate education such as Initial Teacher Training, Postgraduate Certification, and further studies at Masters’ and/or Doctorate level. Graduate destinations have previously been situated within the areas of education, early years provision, family support work, social care, therapeutic settings and charitable organisations.

Fees and finance

2021-22     

  • Full-time Tuition fee: £9,250 p.a.
  • Part-time Tuition fee: £1,454 per 20 credit module (please contact the Student Centre for further information).
  • International Tuition fee: £12,150 p.a. 

2022-23*

  • Full-time tuition fee: £9,250 p.a
  • Part-time tuition fee: £1,454 per 20 credits (please contact the Student Centre for further information)
  • Full-time International tuition fee: £14,598 p.a

Further Information

At University of Suffolk, your tuition fees provide access to all the usual teaching and learning facilities that you would expect. However, there may be additional costs associated with you course that you will need to budget for. 

* 2022-23 tuition fees are subject to change in line with inflation, or a government change in the fee cap.

Entry requirements

Course options

For placements you do not need to be in employment.

Students are encouraged, in coordination with a School placements officer drawn from the academic staff, to find their own placement. As needed the School with provide additional support for finding placements amongst those students pursuing the optional practice element.

Staff

Dr Wendy Lecluyse began her career as a Paediatric Speech and Language Therapist. She obtained my graduate degree in Speech and Language Therapy and Audiology in 1998 at Ghent University (BEL) and subsequently worked as an SLT specializing in hearing impairment and specific language...

Sarah is a Senior Lecturer in Childhood in the School of Social Sciences and Humanities. Sarah began her career as a Registered Nurse at the Leeds General Infirmary. Subsequently, she graduated from the Open University with a BSc (Hons) in Psychology and began a career in teaching. ...

Dr Dogaru is a paediatrician-turned-social scientist, with a medical degree from University of Medicine and Pharmacy in Romania and a PhD in Human Development and Family Sciences from Oregon State University, USA. Dr Dogaru has over 20 years of interdisciplinary professional and aca...

Maureen is a sociologist whose research centres on constructions of the body, reproductive politics, and subjectivity. Maureen joined University of Suffolk in 2014 as a lecturer for Childhood Studies and was appointed course leader for the MA Childhood Studies in 2015. She graduated...

Carolyn is a lecturer within the Childhoods program. In 2015 Carolyn qualified with an Advanced Diploma in Psychotherapeutic Counselling including hypnotherapy and counselling skills. From 2016, Carolyn worked within the Student Services team at the University of Suffolk before comp...

Dr Ivana Lessner Listiakova is a Senior Lecturer in Childhood Studies, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Suffolk. Her expertise is in inclusive education, learning support, sensory processing difficulties, sensory strategies, and creative arts therapies and int...

Sarah is the Associate Dean for Research in the School of Social Science and Humanities. She is an Associate Professor of social policy specialising in childhood. She has over twenty years of teaching experience in higher education and international schools. At the University of Suf...

Dr Marianna Stella is a Lecturer in Education and Childhood at the School of Social Sciences and Humanities. Marianna’s main areas of focus are around development of educational practice, teacher training, Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLD), dyslexia, inclusive education and wi...

Dr Pallawi Sinha is a Lecturer in Childhood Studies. Pallawi is passionate about building dialogue and understanding on education and childhoods, particularly in indigenous, disadvantaged and marginalised contexts; ‘other’ epistemologies; difference; ecologies of learning; the e...

Facilities and Resources

Most of our teaching takes place at our Waterfront Building situated on Ipswich marina. The Waterfront Building has modern seminar rooms, lecture rooms and an auditorium. It’s also home to several flexible open-study spaces available for students to use as well as picturesque views across the waterfront. The Atrium Building is another location for our teaching and again contains modern seminar rooms with AV equipment and a café on the ground floor.