STUDY

Undergraduate

BA (Hons) English

Circle of books
Course options: Professional Placement, Study Abroad
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: Q303
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time.
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)
Course options: Professional Placement, Study Abroad
Institution code: S82
UCAS code: Q303
Start date: September 2024
Duration: Three years full-time, four and a half to nine years part-time.
Location: Ipswich
Typical Offer: 112 UCAS tariff points (or above), BBC (A-Level), DMM (BTEC), Merit (T Level)

Overview

Our unique BA (Hons) English programme allows you to stretch both sides of your brain. On the course, you will gain a foundation in literature, creative writing, and linguistics, working with professional published authors, active researchers, and HEA-accredited lecturers. This broad foundation allows you to gain a wide range of key skills, from creativity to data collection, and to pursue careers in a variety of fields, including publishing, research, teaching, the arts, museums and heritage, marketing, copyediting, and media and public relations.  
 
You will study a range of classic and contemporary literature and theory, exploring contemporary topics such as queer approaches to poetry, gothic horror in young adult fiction, Shakespeare in performance, and how twenty-first century writing engages with the climate crisis. You will have the opportunity to specialize on the distinct Literature and Creative Writing and Literature and Linguistics pathways, or to select options from both routes on our flexible English degree programme. 
 
Our course makes full use of our location in Suffolk. The county’s coastal villages and towns attract writers and artists from all over the world and feature in classic novels by Charles Dickens, George Orwell and Arthur Ransome. The richly intriguing historical development across the region also makes East Anglia a fascinating dialect area for linguistics studies. Special class trips, partnerships, and competitions such as the Student New Angle Prize will help you to explore this region and develop your own independent research and writing.  

The University of Suffolk is world-class and committed to our region. We are proudly modern and innovative and we believe in transformative education. We are on the rise with a focus on student satisfaction, graduate prospects, spending on academic services and student facilities.

8th

in the UK for Creative Writing

The Guardian University Guide 2022

100%

student satisfaction for English

The National Student Survey (NSS) 2021

2nd

in the East of England for graduate prospects

The Complete University Guide 2024

Course Modules

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend' - more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.

Discovery is the theme for your first year, where you will gain a foundation in the core areas of literature, linguistics, and creative writing. Longer blocks will help you to develop your ideas across assignments and our special skills weeks will help you prepare for your assignments and the world beyond the classroom. Our blend of classic and contemporary texts allows you to build a solid foundation in literature and to explore the ways in which stories help us to shape and understand our world today.

In your second year, you can choose our linguistics, creative writing or English pathway, where you select between different modules. You will also develop your own ideas for an independent research project to pursue further. 

In your final year, you will choose your own independent project in literature, linguistics, or creative writing. Previous students have explored a range of independent projects, from original animated series to research on Suffolk words or fantastic dialects. You will also choose a professional placement to gain further employability skills, which has led to direct employment for some students.  

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.
A student reading a book in front of a bookshelf

This module supports you in developing the necessary knowledge and skills of analysis and criticism required for undergraduate work in English Literature. The module offers an introduction to the major literary genres – drama, poetry, prose – and invites you to explore critical approaches, concepts, and methodologies in the study of a broad range of literary texts, from classical plays to contemporary poetry.  

This module is designed to equip you with the terminology and confidence for analysing language across a range of data sources. You will develop skills in language analysis that will be activated throughout their chosen degree programme, as well as in many professions. Relevant skills will be practiced and developed through instruction relating to the four core frameworks of theoretical linguistics (phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics), as well as elements of Historical Linguistics and Sociolinguistics. 

This module will provide you with a toolkit of creative skills and techniques to develop original writing across a range of forms, including poetry, prose, and drama. Through creative writing workshops and close analysis of craft, you will develop the basic skills and practices required to develop their writing in future creative writing modules. You will be encouraged to examine how critical reflection and creative practice inform and supplement each other, and to view writing as part of an ongoing, developing practice, informed by diverse influences, experiences and cultures. 

You will build on your foundation in critical theory from your first year, examining a range of theoretical approaches to texts, including Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, feminism, postcolonial theory and postmodernism in greater detail. You will apply theory to literary texts and contemporary debates, developing multiple perspectives on a variety of topics such as language, reality, subjectivity, gender, race, and sexuality. 

This module builds on the knowledge and practice obtained in your Skills weeks, supporting you as you prepare to design and complete an individual academic research project in English studies. On the module, you will explore the methods, approaches and structural components of an extended research project through examples in literature, linguistics, and creative writing. 

This module introduces you to the literary field of adaptation studies, exploring the afterlives of a range of ‘source’ texts through a critical and creative assessment of processes of textual transformation. Through an analysis of texts where characters’ afterlives also feature in the narrative, you will investigate shifts in media, genre, audience, ideological positions and modes of production and consumption. 

This module enables you to undertake a thematic study of Shakespeare’s dramatic work based on the detailed study of plays from different genres. These plays will be studied both as responses to the political, social and religious changes of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries and as works of continuing relevance through a close examination of recent and varied performance contexts. 

This module represents a more theoretical consideration of textuality, providing preparation for students' own independent research. You will consider core topics and approaches in language study such as language variation, creativity in language use, stylistics, cognitive poetics and critical discourse analysis. 

The module examines three major frameworks of language: acquisition, production and comprehension. These are examined and analysed through a range of case studies and linguistic data. In addition, Learning English presents and discusses theories and data relating to the acquisition of conversational skills in English, as well as a variety of language disorders.  

This module will explore how versions of the self are written through memoir, autobiography and life writing. You will consider different critical responses to autobiography and life writing and ways of creatively writing the self.  The module will also examine the relationship that autobiographical writing has with writing fiction, autobiografiction and ethnographic practices. 

In this module, you will explore different popular genres, including science fiction, fantasy, crime, and historical fiction. Each week, you will analyse a novel or short stories from a different genre and gain a broad understanding of the formal techniques and thematic concerns that underpin writing in this genre. You will then practice these techniques in your own writing, gaining skills in world-building, character creation, plot construction, and the planning of novels.  

This module considers how contemporary writing engages with the climate crisis. Examining a variety of forms (including plays, novels, and poetry) we will consider how contemporary literature negotiates the challenges of representing a crisis that spans across national borders and multiple decades. The module aims to consolidate your analytical, critical and intellectual skills through the study of a range of genres and a variety of theoretical approaches.  

This module introduces you to the role of horror in young adult fiction, inviting analyses of works from literature, cinema and television that are categorised as dark fantasy, dystopian fiction, sci-fi horror and paranormal romance. Through close reading and independent research, you will examine issues relating to gender, power, identity and sexuality against the self-reflexive nature of horror and its highly subversive potential. 

You will undertake student-centred learning based on a placement, which will build on their knowledge from language and creative writing modules, along with subject specific writing and IT skills. You will also gain knowledge about professional writing from seminars with professional writers. 

This module provides an opportunity for you to explore, over a year, a chosen topic of your interest. Literature students will design and carry out an extensive or significant piece of independent research, examining an area of scholarship that they wish to pursue. Creative writing students will produce an original creative writing portfolio, whether a novel extract or collection of drama, short stories, or poetry. Linguistics students will undertake a project that synthesises novel data and scholarly literature to examine an original research question. All students will be assigned a specialist supervisor and meet regularly as a supportive learning group to consider common research issues and workshop their ideas.  

This module invites you to work with influential and contemporary scripts written for the stage and screen to support the production of their own short script. You will explore a selection of performance texts written for theatre, television and cinema in the twentieth century and up to the present day, engaging with crucial differences in forms of performance writing to understand the demands of each particular medium. 

This module considers how language, and particularly dialect, are used in literature and film. The focus is primarily on sociolinguistic aspects, allowing you to assess how literature and film reflect actual language, and what this may tell us about linguistic attitudes and use. The module will give you a foundation in some key dialect features and characteristics, with a particular focus on British and North American dialects.  

This module gives you the opportunity to explore in depth a specific topic (subject to supervisory agreement) emerging from their wider study of literature, linguistics, or creative writing. 

Course Modules 2024

Our undergraduate programmes are delivered as 'block and blend' - more information can be found on Why Suffolk? You can also watch our Block and Blend video.

Discovery is the theme for your first year, where you will gain a foundation in the core areas of literature, linguistics, and creative writing. Longer blocks will help you to develop your ideas across assignments and our special skills weeks will help you prepare for your assignments and the world beyond the classroom. Our blend of classic and contemporary texts allows you to build a solid foundation in literature and to explore the ways in which stories help us to shape and understand our world today.

In your second year, you can choose our linguistics, creative writing or English pathway, where you select between different modules. You will also develop your own ideas for an independent research project to pursue further. 

In your final year, you will choose your own independent project in literature, linguistics, or creative writing. Previous students have explored a range of independent projects, from original animated series to research on Suffolk words or fantastic dialects. You will also choose a professional placement to gain further employability skills, which has led to direct employment for some students.  

Downloadable information regarding all University of Suffolk courses, including Key Facts, Course Aims, Course Structure and Assessment, is available in the Definitive Course Record.
A student reading a book in front of a bookshelf

This module supports you in developing the necessary knowledge and skills of analysis and criticism required for undergraduate work in English Literature. The module offers an introduction to the major literary genres – drama, poetry, prose – and invites you to explore critical approaches, concepts, and methodologies in the study of a broad range of literary texts, from classical plays to contemporary poetry.  

This module is designed to equip you with the terminology and confidence for analysing language across a range of data sources. You will develop skills in language analysis that will be activated throughout their chosen degree programme, as well as in many professions. Relevant skills will be practiced and developed through instruction relating to the four core frameworks of theoretical linguistics (phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics), as well as elements of Historical Linguistics and Sociolinguistics. 

This module will provide you with a toolkit of creative skills and techniques to develop original writing across a range of forms, including poetry, prose, and drama. Through creative writing workshops and close analysis of craft, you will develop the basic skills and practices required to develop their writing in future creative writing modules. You will be encouraged to examine how critical reflection and creative practice inform and supplement each other, and to view writing as part of an ongoing, developing practice, informed by diverse influences, experiences and cultures. 

You will build on your foundation in critical theory from your first year, examining a range of theoretical approaches to texts, including Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, feminism, postcolonial theory and postmodernism in greater detail. You will apply theory to literary texts and contemporary debates, developing multiple perspectives on a variety of topics such as language, reality, subjectivity, gender, race, and sexuality. 

This module builds on the knowledge and practice obtained in your Skills weeks, supporting you as you prepare to design and complete an individual academic research project in English studies. On the module, you will explore the methods, approaches and structural components of an extended research project through examples in literature, linguistics, and creative writing. 

This module introduces you to the literary field of adaptation studies, exploring the afterlives of a range of ‘source’ texts through a critical and creative assessment of processes of textual transformation. Through an analysis of texts where characters’ afterlives also feature in the narrative, you will investigate shifts in media, genre, audience, ideological positions and modes of production and consumption. 

This module enables you to undertake a thematic study of Shakespeare’s dramatic work based on the detailed study of plays from different genres. These plays will be studied both as responses to the political, social and religious changes of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries and as works of continuing relevance through a close examination of recent and varied performance contexts. 

This module represents a more theoretical consideration of textuality, providing preparation for students' own independent research. You will consider core topics and approaches in language study such as language variation, creativity in language use, stylistics, cognitive poetics and critical discourse analysis. 

The module examines three major frameworks of language: acquisition, production and comprehension. These are examined and analysed through a range of case studies and linguistic data. In addition, Learning English presents and discusses theories and data relating to the acquisition of conversational skills in English, as well as a variety of language disorders.  

This module will explore how versions of the self are written through memoir, autobiography and life writing. You will consider different critical responses to autobiography and life writing and ways of creatively writing the self.  The module will also examine the relationship that autobiographical writing has with writing fiction, autobiografiction and ethnographic practices. 

In this module, you will explore different popular genres, including science fiction, fantasy, crime, and historical fiction. Each week, you will analyse a novel or short stories from a different genre and gain a broad understanding of the formal techniques and thematic concerns that underpin writing in this genre. You will then practice these techniques in your own writing, gaining skills in world-building, character creation, plot construction, and the planning of novels.  

This module considers how contemporary writing engages with the climate crisis. Examining a variety of forms (including plays, novels, and poetry) we will consider how contemporary literature negotiates the challenges of representing a crisis that spans across national borders and multiple decades. The module aims to consolidate your analytical, critical and intellectual skills through the study of a range of genres and a variety of theoretical approaches.  

This module introduces you to the role of horror in young adult fiction, inviting analyses of works from literature, cinema and television that are categorised as dark fantasy, dystopian fiction, sci-fi horror and paranormal romance. Through close reading and independent research, you will examine issues relating to gender, power, identity and sexuality against the self-reflexive nature of horror and its highly subversive potential. 

You will undertake student-centred learning based on a placement, which will build on their knowledge from language and creative writing modules, along with subject specific writing and IT skills. You will also gain knowledge about professional writing from seminars with professional writers. 

This module provides an opportunity for you to explore, over a year, a chosen topic of your interest. Literature students will design and carry out an extensive or significant piece of independent research, examining an area of scholarship that they wish to pursue. Creative writing students will produce an original creative writing portfolio, whether a novel extract or collection of drama, short stories, or poetry. Linguistics students will undertake a project that synthesises novel data and scholarly literature to examine an original research question. All students will be assigned a specialist supervisor and meet regularly as a supportive learning group to consider common research issues and workshop their ideas.  

This module invites you to work with influential and contemporary scripts written for the stage and screen to support the production of their own short script. You will explore a selection of performance texts written for theatre, television and cinema in the twentieth century and up to the present day, engaging with crucial differences in forms of performance writing to understand the demands of each particular medium. 

This module considers how language, and particularly dialect, are used in literature and film. The focus is primarily on sociolinguistic aspects, allowing you to assess how literature and film reflect actual language, and what this may tell us about linguistic attitudes and use. The module will give you a foundation in some key dialect features and characteristics, with a particular focus on British and North American dialects.  

This module gives you the opportunity to explore in depth a specific topic (subject to supervisory agreement) emerging from their wider study of literature, linguistics, or creative writing. 

Waterfront Building reflecting in the marina

WHY SUFFOLK

16th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Best Facilities 2023

WUSCA 2023

5th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Career Prospects 2023

WUSCA 2023

14th place in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards for Student Support 2023

WUSCA 2023
The ceiling in the Waterfront Building
Inside the Waterfront Building
Boats on the marina in front of the Waterfront Building
The Waterfront Building on Ipswich Marina
Bookshelves and step ladder
The Library
A student sitting with a laptop
SU Social Space

Entry Requirements

home-masthead-th

Career Opportunities

Our English degree provides you with a range of transferrable skills for future employment and study. The skills you gain in critical thinking, professional writing, presentation, and research will help you work in a variety of fields including the arts, museums and heritage, teaching, marketing, journalism, copyediting, and media and public relations. Whether you want to inspire future generations of students or going on to postgraduate study, we will support you to find the career that most excites you.  
 
Throughout your studies, you will be guided by our Careers Team and a specialized program that will help you think about your future. Three skills weeks in your first year supplement your modules and provide special training and application of new skills, from working with media to data analysis. In your third year, you will find a work placement as part of the Professional Practice module, which will help you to enhance your employability skills, learn from industry experts, and build effective relationships with local schools, businesses, and arts organizations.  
 
Our Talking Shop workshops will also help you to explore the world of writing. Regular workshops, seminars, and interviews with publishers, literary agents, arts professionals, and writers help to demystify the publication process and provide practical advice on how to develop your writing.  

Your Course Team

Dr Darragh Martin

Darragh is Course Leader, BA (Hons) English and writes novels, plays, and stories for children.

Darragh Martin staff profile photo

Dr Lindsey Scott

Lindsey is Course leader for MA Creative and Critical Writing and award-winning lecturer specialising in the field of adaption studies.

Lindsey Scott profile photo on yellow background

Dr Jenny Amos

Dr Jenny Amos is a socio-phonologist who specialises in modelling dialect variation, lecturing in Linguistics at the University of Suffolk.

Jenny Amos staff profile photo

Dr Andrea Smith

Andrea is Lecturer in English and Creative Writing. Her career prior to joining the University included working for two Suffolk newspapers and the BBC.

Andrea Smith staff profile photo

Katie Ward

Katie teaches on the BA (Hons) English course, and the MA Creative and Critical Writing course, at University of Suffolk.

Katie Ward staff profile photo

Fees and Funding

UK Full-time Tuition Fee

£9,250

per year
UK Part-time Tuition Fee

£1,454*

per 20 credit module
International Full-time Tuition Fee

£14,610

per year

*Please contact the Student Centre for further details

The decision to study a degree is an investment into your future, there are various means of support available to you in order to help fund your tuition fees and living costs. You can apply for funding from the Spring before your course starts.

UK Fees and Finance UK Bursaries and Scholarships International Fees and Scholarships

Ipswich Award

The University of Suffolk is offering a £1,000 Award for students joining the University of Suffolk’s Ipswich campus. The Award is based on specific eligibility criteria based on your year of entry.

More information
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How to Apply

To study this course on a full-time basis, you can apply through UCAS. As well as providing your academic qualifications, you’ll be able to showcase your skills, qualities and passion for the subject.

Apply Now Further Information on Applying
A silhouette of a student in their cap and gown

Kay Saberton, BA (Hons) English

"I studied the BA English course for three years and enjoyed every minute. I’d never felt confident in my writing abilities but, with the guidance of my tutors, I began to realise that I was worthy of having a voice. I achieved several awards during my studies, such as the East Anglian Daily Times Award for Professional Writing and the Suffolk Book League Award for Best Dissertation in English."

read more
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Related Courses

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MA Creative and Critical Writing

The MA in Creative and Critical Writing invites you to focus on your passion for creative writing whilst engaging with the most up-to-date debates in critical theory.

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