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Dr Krissy Wilson

Senior Lecturer in Psychology

Dr Krissy Wilson

T: 01473 338519
E: K.Wilson4@uos.ac.uk

Introduction

Krissy has had a rather eclectic career starting out an a professional actress.  She then joined British Airways and worked as cabin crew for six years.  Whilst working for BA she studied for a BSc in Psychology and went on to complete a Masters in Research Methods at Reading University and a PhD at Goldsmiths College, University of London.  In 2007 she left the UK to take up a lectureship in Australia where she worked for eight years.  She has recently returned to the UK and began her new role at University of Suffolk in January 2016.  Her doctoral thesis was on the topic of memory for anomalous events; exploring the vulnerable nature of memory for both normal and ostensibly paranormal events.  Her main research area is in the field of the psychology of belief including cognitive, biological and environmental factors that impact on beliefs in extraordinary phenomena.  She has published her work in peer reviewed journals and book chapters, and given talks and presentations both nationally and internationally and regularly appears on national radio and television to discuss a variety of belief related topics.

Research Interests

Consistent and ubiquitous belief in the paranormal is a striking and noteworthy facet of the human condition.  Belief in phenomena that contradicts known scientific laws and principles is a common feature of all western societies, and there is little evidence to suggest that widespread paranormal beliefs are on the wane.  Indeed, recent polls tend to suggest that commonly held beliefs such as mediumship, ghosts and clairvoyance are in fact on the increase.  Anomalistic psychology is an emerging field of research that seeks to explore the psychological and in some cases physiological reasons why individuals believe in extraordinary phenomena.  Is there for example a belief personality?  Are some of us more susceptible to certain types of beliefs compared to others?  What other factors might explain why we consistently cling to beliefs in weird and wonderful phenomena? 

Selected Publications

Wilson, K. & French, C.C. (2014).  Magic and memory:  Using conjuring to explore the effects of suggestion, social influence, and paranormal belief on eyewitness testimony for an ostensibly paranormal event.  Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 1289

Wilson, K., Finn, J. S., & Wilson, H. (2013). The belief stroop: information processing and the relationship between religious and paranormal belief. International Journal of Social Science and Humanities, Vol 4(6), 474-478.  

Irwin, H. & Wilson, K. (2013). Anomalous experiences and the intuitive experiential style of thinking. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, Vol 77, 65-71.

Wilson, K. (2011) The Psychology of Suggestion. The Psychologist (UK), 24,782-783.

Wilson, K. (2010) The True Believers The Psychology of Faith. Australasian Science, Vol 31(6), 18-20.

Wilson, K., & French, C. C. (2006). The relationship between susceptibility to false memories, dissociativity, and paranormal belief and experience. Personality and Individual Differences 41,1493-1502.

Wilson, K., & French, C. C. (2006). The relationship between susceptibility to false memories, dissociativity, and paranormal belief and experience. Personality and Individual Differences 41,1493-1502.