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Digital Destinies - looking at the wider implications

Professor Peter Cochrane

To book a place

Places are free of charge and can be booked on the link below

Thursday, 19 January 2017,
18:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Waterfront Building

The lecture starts at 18:00 with registration from 17:30 

Contemplating digital futures a sector at a time is relatively easy, but in a networked world driven by accelerating technologies this is insufficient.  Sectors do not exist or operate in isolation, they are connected, and as technology begets ever more technology, sectors boundaries morph, with whole industries overtaken and pushed aside. Work and life are changed as old jobs lose relevance to be replaced by the new.

As a species we have never known or understood so much about our world and universe, and nor have we enjoyed the capabilities now presented by modern industries and medicines.  But keeping up to date, acquiring the right knowledge and understanding is a growing challenge as ‘the world of the simple’ evaporates.

“We have big data, but we need big understanding”

In a largely networked, non-linear and chaotic world, anticipating and preparing for change whilst coping with the status quo presents many new challenges with many aspects well beyond human ability. We need the help of our machines and adaptive models to aid our decisions.  For organisations it is essential to establish ‘tech radars’ to compliment their knowledge of markets. Continually acquiring, mining and analysing data to identify looming threats and opportunities has to become the norm.

“There are plenty of simple solutions to complex problems, but they are all wrong”

Peter recently joined the University of Suffolk as a visiting Professor and is a seasoned professional with decades of hands on technology, operational and managerial experience in industry along with a wealth of academic contributions spanning more than 40 years. As Head of Research and CTO at BT his 1000 strong team spanned optical fibre, fixed and mobile networks, security, complex systems, AI, AL, and human interfaces. After leaving BT in 2000 Peter has been employed in the defence, logistics, travel, retail, energy,  healthcare, transport and pharma sectors. He has also engaged in the founding of numerous companies and start-up investments.

Appointed as the UK's first Prof for the Public Understanding of Science & Tech @ Bristol in 1998, Peter received the Queen's Award for Innovation & Export in 1990, an OBE (1999) for contributions to International Telecommunications, The IEEE Millennial Medal and numerous Honorary Doctorates.

 

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Professor Peter Cochrane