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What to bring to a lecture

25 SEPTEMBER 2018 - SARAH - STUDENT LIFE

whattobringlectures

I can’t believe how quickly Fresher’s Week has gone! Now I’m just a couple of hours away from my first lecture of second year. Many of you will be starting your first lectures this week, and you might be wondering what you should be bringing with you. This handy guide will help you plan for 9am lectures, back-to-back lectures, and tips for those commuting in.

To take notes

Personally, I found during my first year that taking a laptop to lectures was the most effective way for me to take notes. You have everything in one place, and can take things from other lectures (just don’t get tempted to do an online shopping spree!).

If you prefer note taking with pen and paper, get organised and have a different notebook for each module. The thing you probably won’t need is a range of different coloured pens and highlighters. Save those for your self-study!

 

Staying awake

9am lectures are often difficult to get into and I know for myself, it always takes me a bit longer to wake up. Consider getting a travel mug and bringing some coffee with you to perk up. Even afternoon lectures can be a bit tiring, so always take a bottle of water with you to stay awake and hydrated.

If you have back-to-back lectures, bring a snack for in between; give yourself a boost of energy!

 

For the times you’re a bit stuck

Starting university can feel very daunting, especially being in a new place and not being quite sure about where to go. Download the Outlook app to keep your timetable on you so that you know where you’re going.

Bring your pre-reading notes (and do your pre-reading) so that you know what the lecturer is talking about. Don’t worry if you feel a bit lost in your first week, it takes a bit of time to get used to, but in no time, you’ll feel fine.

The most important thing to do in lectures is listen, ask questions and enjoy the learning. After all, you’ve made the decision to come to uni, so enjoy your experience. If you find you don’t understand, talk to your lecturer. They’ll be more than happy to help you.

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