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Information about Non-Medical Help

Non-Medical Help (NMH) rates for University of Suffolk: 

 

Non-Medical Help is funded by disabled students allowance (DSA). Students will not be billed directly for these services, but your disability adviser will support you to apply for disabled students allowance for your specialist support needs. Following an assessment of needs, your disability adviser will work with you to create a unique support package.

What you can expect from NMH support:

Band One: Practical Assistance

Activity Descriptor

Example of activity

How do I access this?

Practical Support Assistant

This may include providing practical and mobility support to assist students with a physical impairment in manoeuvring around the campus. This could include helping to manipulate a wheelchair, carrying books, IT equipment etc. It could also include general orientation and finding out where things are located for students whose disability means that they have difficulties with orientation. It could also include ‘social support’ in order to ensure access to the wider aspects of student life, for example for a student on the autistic spectrum who has difficulty with social interaction.

While some of these tasks, such as carrying equipment for a student will need to continue throughout a student’s course, others, such as general orientation, should decrease as the student becomes more able to manage independently. In all cases the assistant will need to hold regular reviews with the student to assess how well the support is working.

Speak to your Disability Adviser or the Needs Assessor about your specific needs.

Library Support Assistant

To help students search library catalogues, locate materials, collect materials, photocopying etc.

Reader

To read aloud for a student whose disability makes reading or other forms of accessing text impossible.

Scribe

To write down what the student dictates.

Workshop/Laborat ory Assistant

To support a student in gaining access to the practical aspects of their course, e.g. in the laboratory or in a workshop/studio situation e.g. technical workshop or dance studio.

Sighted Guide

To provide one to one mobility assistance to a student with a visual impairment helping them to navigate their way around the campus.

Band Two: Enhanced  Assistance

Activity Descriptor

Example of activity

How can I access this?

Study Assistant

Study support which uses a mix of enabling strategies, complemented by some practical assistance. Enabling strategies may include supporting the student in adapting to the academic demands of HE, providing information, help with time keeping and help with organisational skills. Support may be supplemented with practical support e.g. library support, workshop support.

Speak to your Disability Adviser or the Needs Assessor about your specific needs.

Examination Support Workers

Support to gain access to the examination and fulfil its requirements. This covers the activities of exam reader, exam scribe and exam prompter. It can include reading out the exam paper, writing down student answers using exactly the words used by the student and for some students who might get very focussed on a specific question, giving a prompt as to when it is time to move on to another question.

Manual Notetakers

The activity of notetaking is to produce an accurate and legible handwritten record of the content of lectures, seminars, discussions and off-campus events. in the student’s preferred style and format. Notes should contain pertinent information from the session (and any questions and discussions if required), may include diagrams and may be referenced to any hand-outs. The notetaker must hand over notes in the agreed format within a specified time frame.

Band Three: Specialist Enabling  Support                                          

          

Activity Descriptor

Example of activity                                                             

How can I access this?                              

Specialist Transcription Service

To transcribe lecture notes, seminar notes, oral dictation or audio files into an alternative format accessible to the student.

Speak to your Disability Adviser or the Needs Assessor

Electronic Notetakers

This support activity is for deaf students but can be used to support other students according to need. The notetaker will make a comprehensive although non-verbatim, live, typed record of the content of lectures, seminars, discussions and off-campus events. in the student’s preferred style and format. This may include the information appearing simultaneously on the student’s computer using either Speedtext or Stereotype specialist software. The laptop could also be linked to Braille reading equipment. The notes can be sent to the student within a specified time frame or will be saved by the student at the end of the session if using the specialist software described above.

Band Four: Specialist Access and Learning  Facilitators

 

Activity Descriptor

Example of activity

How do I access this?

Specialist Mentors

Specialist mentors provide highly specialist, specifically tailored, one-to-one support that helps students address the barriers to learning created by a particular impairment e.g. mental- health conditions, or autistic spectrum conditions. This could include a range of issues, for example, coping with anxiety and stress, concentration difficulties, time management, prioritising workload and creating a suitable work-life balance. Specialist mentors should not act as advocates or counsellors. Their role is to help students recognise the barriers to learning created by their impairment and support them in developing strategies to address these barriers, particularly at times of transition, e.g. when starting university or planning to move on from it. For some students this support will need to be ongoing while for others it might be gradually phased out or only required at certain points of their course.

Speak to your Disability Adviser or the Needs Assessor

Specialist One-to-One Study Skills Support

This one to one support addresses the issues which some students might have in acquiring, recalling and retaining information in written and spoken language as well as the range of memory, organisational, attention and numeracy difficulties that students with specific learning difficulties often face when working in an HE context. These difficulties may have been identified already but they may only become evident when a student faces the academic challenges of HE work. This support should aim to develop students’ skills for autonomy in the learning environment. It should be tailored to a student’s  individual needs and professionals delivering the support should set out clear goals and timescales for achieving these goals.

 

 

 

Book an appointment with an Academic Skills Adviser, Learning Services